cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
dignity
Aspiring Contributor
331 Views
Message 31 of 33

Re: BT don't seem to have a clue, maybe some of you do.

Thanks maniac886, well after ringing up yesterday they are sending a REIN engineer on Tuesday as they have done all they can there side apparently. Its definitely not the street lights, I have a feeling it something next door but hopefully the REIN engineer can find it, Problem is its fine during the day so I don't know if he will be able to find anything.

 

Anthony

0 Ratings
Icaras
Aspiring Expert
304 Views
Message 32 of 33

Re: BT don't seem to have a clue, maybe some of you do.

It'll just be a broadband engineer. There aren't specific 'REIN engineers'.

0 Ratings
PheeragHfre
Recognised Expert
285 Views
Message 33 of 33

Re: BT don't seem to have a clue, maybe some of you do.

 


@dignity wrote:

Thanks maniac886, well after ringing up yesterday they are sending a REIN engineer on Tuesday as they have done all they can there side apparently. Its definitely not the street lights, I have a feeling it something next door but hopefully the REIN engineer can find it, Problem is its fine during the day so I don't know if he will be able to find anything.

 

Anthony


 

If it is REIN, It is likely to be locally generated REIN but on rare occassions you can get a problem from particular radio broadcasts transmitted on MW frequencies. (I need to stress RARE.)

 

If the length of your copper cabling (& direction from the cabinet) acts as an antenna at a particlar frequency & if a radio transmission is present at that frquency, then your might suffer from increased rein due to skywave propogation.

 

 

http://www.hfradio.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=62

Quote:

 

For medium wave, the most obvious factor for good DX is the time of day. The D Layer of the ionosphere almost always absorbs medium wave radio signals during the daylight hours. As a result, nearly all medium wave signals received during midday hours will arrive by groundwave propagation, rather than by skywaves refracted off of the ionosphere. Groundwave propagation makes reception of signals past a few hundred miles away unusual during the day. At night, however, the ionosphere tends to refract these medium wave signals, making it possible for radio stations to be heard at much greater distances. When conditions are just right, you might hear stations as far away as Australia, Europe, and Asia.

 

 

"I have this awful feeling someone is watching every move I make (one of my pet hates is router location tagging)." Marvin (A paranoid Android)
0 Ratings