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D-ave
Expert
382 Views
Message 1 of 5

Bits, bytes and megabits

In telecommunications (data rates) 1,000,000 bits in a megabit, apparently.

 

In computing (file size)  1,048,576 bytes in a megabyte, apparently (1,048,576 bits in a megabit)

 

There are different names available to distinguish them (e.g. kibibit/kilobit) but apparently, these and similar are often not used. Result? Confusion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megabyte

 

I suspect that quite a few people don't realise this - I didn't. Makes a difference when you are trying to check your upload and download speeds and verify BT's claims about their speeds.  😉

 

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4 REPLIES 4
Distinguished Guru
369 Views
Message 2 of 5

Re: Bits, bytes and megabits

There's something horribly wrong there.

 

131 072 bytes is 128K bytes, and nowhere near a megabyte.  However, 131 072 bytes is 1 048 576 bits, or 1 megabit.

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D-ave
Expert
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Message 3 of 5

Re: Bits, bytes and megabits

Moment of madness: corrected.

 

The point remains, that you have to adjust for this when testing internet speeds by timing file uploads or downloads and perhaps also before criticising BT for publishing 'exaggerated' speeds. Something that I discovered this evening!

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Alan63
Expert
335 Views
Message 4 of 5

Re: Bits, bytes and megabits

it's 8:1 isn't it. There are 8 bits in 1 byte

 

thus 56kbps = 56,000bps = 7MBs

 

something like that?

 

 

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ironman123
Recognised Expert
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Message 5 of 5

Re: Bits, bytes and megabits

The way I do it is X the results on speedtesters that give results in kbps [something like 74500/15500] by 1024.

The fake results above would be 74500x1024 = 76288000Kbps which = 76.28Mbps [approx 76.3Mbps] which is very near the line max after overheads.cool.:)

.................................... 

74954kbps = 76752896Kbps = 76.7Mbps
15207 = 15571968Kbps = 15.6Mbps

these are my actual readings.

 

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