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shazwri
Beginner
2,540 Views
Message 1 of 5

Fault on line, what's classed as the boundary

Does anyone know what's classed as the boundary as I have a fault on my line and can't make outgoingf calls. I can't see any problems so I'm wondering if the Demarcation point is classed as mine or BT's. The one in my house looks as if it;s from the 1930s as it Bakelite and i've never seen one like it..any one know ...

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4 REPLIES 4
Keith_Beddoe
Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
2,520 Views
Message 2 of 5

Re: Fault on line, what's classed as the boundary

Which type of master socket do you have?

 

 

 

One of these

 

 

 

NTE5_fl[1].jpg

 

 

 

Or one of these

 

 

 

LJU2_front[1].jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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plainview
Recognised Expert
2,519 Views
Message 3 of 5

Re: Fault on line, what's classed as the boundary

Openreach maintain everything up to and including the master socket inside your house.

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brazenscroll
Contributor
2,474 Views
Message 4 of 5

Re: Fault on line, what's classed as the boundary

OK. The demarcation point according to SOME BT staff is "the point at which the cable crosses your boundary". This is what I was told when I had a fault on my incoming line between the master socket and the junction box on the outside of my house.

 

Plainview is correct in that BT maintain everything up to and including the master socket, and that this equipment is provided as part of your BT line rental. BUT. B U T. If there is a problem with the line between your boundary and the master socket and you require a BT engineer to visit to repair any part of this, there is a good chance you will get a bill for £127.99. This appears to be standard proceedure for BT Retail, and it is because BT Openreach bill BT Retail for the engineers time, and BT just want to pass the cost on.

 

The only time you may get away with not paying is if the damage is on the underground line across your property up to the junction box, OR on the overhead line from the pole to the junction box on the outside of your property.

 

Hope this helps

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plainview
Recognised Expert
2,460 Views
Message 5 of 5

Re: Fault on line, what's classed as the boundary

'BUT. B U T. If there is a problem with the line between your boundary and the master socket and you require a BT engineer to visit to repair any part of this, there is a good chance you will get a bill for £127.99. This appears to be standard proceedure for BT Retail, and it is because BT Openreach bill BT Retail for the engineers time, and BT just want to pass the cost on.'

 

Very common misconception with customers, used to wind me it something cronic when I worked in the call centre, just because an engineer had to come into their house they thought they would be charged regardless of what the fault is when that couldn't be any further from the truth. Even if the fault is a network one the engineer probably still needs access to do line tests and get fault distance measurements from the NTE5a.

 

Openreach will only charge if the customer damages the line within the boundary of their property, i.e. if they cut the lead in wire. If say the capacitor in the NTE5a was faulty through old age, remember telephone lines are just electrics at the end of the day and like all electrical things they have a shelf life.

 

Basically an engineer will only charge if;

 

1. You broke the line, even by accident.

 

2. The fault is proved to be with your own internal wiring or anything you have plugged in, that includes BT Vision Boxes or Home Hubs because they are supplied by BT Retail and not Openreach.

 

3. If you call an engineer out for no reason whatsoever, but this should never happen because SP's shouldn't go making appointments for no reason.

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