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A_mars_reject
Aspiring Contributor
1,140 Views
Message 1 of 14

How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

Can anyone help me understand how exactly Infinity and similar cable broadband such as Virgin is supplied from the exchange?

 

As I understand it at the moment:

 

Signal arrives at the exchange, which is fitted with the modern fibre optic cables. Is this correct?

 

Signal leaves exchange and goes down existing, normal phone lines to the junction box at my house. Is this correct?

 

Signal goes from junction box through the house's cabling to the master socket. BT has no responsibility for this section. Is this correct?

 

Signal goes from Master socket to Hub via new modem. Is this correct?

 

The part I'm most interested in is the house cabling stage. I have a noisey line and am thinking of getting an engineer in to try and fix it in hopes of finally getting a steady BB signal. If that cabling is the source of the problem, I need to know whether it would be replaced as part of a fibre optic upgrade, or do the engineers only change the exchange and the modem?

 

Many thanks

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13 REPLIES 13
Geoff93
Recognised Expert
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Message 2 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

All the cabling upto and including the master socket belongs to BT. This is usually the 1st socket after the cable enters the home and usually has some electronic components in it. More modern master sockets have a removable bottom section behind which is a test socket.

Everything past the master socket is yours.

If you have a noisy line then if you have a test socket plug a wired phone into it and do a quite line test - 17070 option 2. It there is noise on the line when in the test socket then report it to BT and a noisy phone line not a broadband fault. If you don't have a test socket then you need to make sure that the noise isn't caused by your internal wiring as BT may then charge for the call out.
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IanC
Recognised Expert
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Message 3 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

 

@A_mars_reject wrote:

Can anyone help me understand how exactly Infinity and similar cable broadband such as Virgin is supplied from the exchange?

 

As I understand it at the moment:

 

Signal arrives at the exchange, which is fitted with the modern fibre optic cables. Is this correct?

 

Mmm...okay, yes.

 

Signal leaves exchange and goes down existing, normal phone lines to the junction box at my house. Is this correct?

 

No. With infinity, the xDSL is fed from the exchange over fibre to a DSLAM/MSAN located in a street cabinet.

FTTC = Fibre To The Cabinet.

 

Signal goes from junction box through the house's cabling to the master socket. BT has no responsibility for this section. Is this correct?

 

The feed into your property is over the existing copper wires from the old street cabinet. BTs responsibility ends at NTE - the master socket, if you like - as before.

 

Signal goes from Master socket to Hub via new modem. Is this correct?

 

Yup.

 

The part I'm most interested in is the house cabling stage. I have a noisey line and am thinking of getting an engineer in to try and fix it in hopes of finally getting a steady BB signal. If that cabling is the source of the problem, I need to know whether it would be replaced as part of a fibre optic upgrade, or do the engineers only change the exchange and the modem?

 

As I understand it, the Infinity installation will provide you with a replacement (filtered) NTE and a cat5 cable to the Infinity Hub. Any existing cabling wouldn't be altered as a matter of course as part of the Infinity install.

 

 

 

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A_mars_reject
Aspiring Contributor
1,129 Views
Message 4 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

Great stuff, thanks both.

 

Couple of follow-on questions: What does NTE stand for?

 

If any repairs or replacements needed to be made to the cabling from the cabinet to the NTE (the old copper part), would BT cover all of that, or would they charge me the dread £127 that they keep warning about?

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IanC
Recognised Expert
1,117 Views
Message 5 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

 


@A_mars_reject wrote:

Great stuff, thanks both.

 

Couple of follow-on questions: What does NTE stand for?

 

Network Terminating Equipment. Another term used is NTTP - Network Test & Termination Point.


It's essentially the demarcation point between the outside line, which is the responsibility of Openreach, and the internal wiring which is yours.

 

If any repairs or replacements needed to be made to the cabling from the cabinet to the NTE (the old copper part), would BT cover all of that, or would they charge me the dread £127 that they keep warning about?

 

Anything between the cabinet and the NTE is down to BT Openreach - unless it's due to physical damage caused by you, etc.

 

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Geoff93
Recognised Expert
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Message 6 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

NTE = Network termination equipment

As I understand it the £127 is charged if the problem is with your wiring.

To prove it is not your wiring disconnect everything within the house and try the quite line test.
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A_mars_reject
Aspiring Contributor
1,112 Views
Message 7 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

Intriguing... we only moved in in April, what the previous owner may have done, I have no idea. I take it BT would consider any physical damage done by them to fall on us as the new owners?

 

In that regard, we did have an engineer out a while back who found a junction in the loft to an extension socket, which he disabled, to give us just the NTE. Would that affect things, meaning if it was previously a homeowner alteration it's now BT's responsibility as the engineer did something and didn't raise any issues? Bit like who touched the ball before it left the pitch....!

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A_mars_reject
Aspiring Contributor
1,103 Views
Message 8 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?


@Geoff93 wrote:
NTE = Network termination equipment

As I understand it the £127 is charged if the problem is with your wiring.

To prove it is not your wiring disconnect everything within the house and try the quite line test.

What would they term to be "my" wiring, though? Anything from the NTE onwards, or anything within the bounds of the house?

 

I've plugged just the phone into the test socekt and done a quiet test, still can hear stuff, though.

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Geoff93
Recognised Expert
1,097 Views
Message 9 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?

Your wiring is anything after the NTE. Even though it is in your home the wiring before it is BT's and you shouldn't touch it.

As you summised - even if the previous occupants damaged the wires the cost will fall on you.

As you have already had a BT engineer who has removed the 'illegal' bits then there shouldn't be an issue about them.
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A_mars_reject
Aspiring Contributor
1,094 Views
Message 10 of 14

Re: How are Infinity and similar cable broadbands supplied?


@Geoff93 wrote:
Your wiring is anything after the NTE. Even though it is in your home the wiring before it is BT's and you shouldn't touch it.

As you summised - even if the previous occupants damaged the wires the cost will fall on you.

As you have already had a BT engineer who has removed the 'illegal' bits then there shouldn't be an issue about them.

Fingers crossed for that. If an engineer found they had to replace the house cabling up to the NTE, do you think we would be charged, or do they cover replacement of aged systems?

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