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MrBusiness
Beginner
1,624 Views
Message 1 of 8

In the interests of being open and honest...

Hi All,

Today just mucking about I decided to scan my network and noticed a few odd ports open on my Smart Hub 6. These ports are not instantly alarming, but I know I didn't create them or are not created by services I can control on the router.

 

one's of interest I found at a glance, there may be others:

external port 7547: TR-069 running gSoap for residential gateway remote management. tis is understandable but i'm not sure it should be running on the default port? a custom high port may be better?

internal port 8888: Running tinyproxy: I don't know why? but I can't just connect to it or control it, so I don't like this one?

internal port 1990: I thought it may be to do with WPS but WPS is turned off so it shouldn't be open???

 

So in the interests of openness and honesty I would like BT (or a BT representitive) to list all the open ports on external and internal interfaces, the ports protocol in use and the purposes BT uses the open ports for. I'm not against BT running services on my equipment like BT wifi and CWMP but I would like to know what ports are for what purposes?

 

I firmly believe this list would not be a security risk but would facilitate open discussion about BT's management of our systems and system security.

 

All the best

Biz

0 Ratings
7 REPLIES 7
john46
Distinguished Sage
1,617 Views
Message 2 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

This is a customer to customer self help forum posts made here do not go to BT although the forum is moderated by BT not every post is read
0 Ratings
MrBusiness
Beginner
1,581 Views
Message 3 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

I'll try my luck, thanks for not being relevant.

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Jo93
Beginner
1,563 Views
Message 4 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

Hello,
one ISP explaned to me they can not sniff in my network. Unfortunatly I disassembled the firmware from the router/modem and found a VPN server that could be aktivated over TR 69 before they gave my that awnser.
My ISPs modem has 3 "backdoors". You can get over TR 64 and an default password root access. There are two hidded admin user (one password is public).
The ACS can greate root users and allow the access to the WebUI over the internet. With the default configuration of that router every ISP in my country has access to the webinterface. Fortunatly the other ISPs are block after the initial configuration over TR 069. (TR 069 uses an default password for the initial configuration and the router gets all password (even VoIP) over TR 069 no user interaction needed). TR 069 is with other systems protected.
But I think there are ISPs that are doing worse in security.

flamethrower
Aspiring Expert
1,550 Views
Message 5 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

Hey @MrBusiness, the tone of your last post isn't entirely compatible with the community spirit here.

 

BT need to administer upwards O(1million) routers. They likely consider that knowledge a competitive differentiator. They are a publicly listed company and have an obligation to their shareholders to best their competition. If someone has enough shares asks the question, perhaps they'd spill the beans, but otherwise sharing this info with the world has nothing to do with being "open and honest".

 

If you don't trust your ISP provided hardware, it is easy enough to setup and install third party alternatives. Plenty of people here have opted out. You may even be able to get a discount when you renew for not taking the hardware. I use a proper router at home (mikrotik hex poe), and have deal with every configuration detail, but love that 🙂

 

Cheers

P.

 

 

MrBusiness
Beginner
1,529 Views
Message 6 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

Hmm, Yes i'm sure they don't sniff my network, and I do trust BT. 

I'm just hoping that they would be a little open about the ports they open and their purpose.

 

Thanks for your input though its appreciated.

0 Ratings
MrBusiness
Beginner
1,517 Views
Message 7 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

hey @flamethrower

One thing I learned early in my life is that you can't read tone into the written word. However I am not a novice forum user, I know BT doesn't have a lot of time for me or my questions, however I have seen them answer a number of questions on this forum. So comments pointing out the obvious are both unhelpfull, unwanted and completly off topic for the question, hence irrellevent. 

If all you can point out is that I may not get an answer, then just don't post. but I'd rather have an open conversation about it with people who care.

 

As I said in my initial post I doubt that there is anything malisious going on but I would like to know the purpose of those open ports and any others they may have.

 

I also doubt very much a list of open ports would be a competitive problem, bigger companies than BT list ports and purpose for equipment that holds alot more competitive value than a home router. I think listing the ports and purpose would go a long way to promoting an open environment.

 

Besides I think any competitor that actually cared about the services would have already reverse engineered the firmware long ago.

 

All the best

Biz.

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flamethrower
Aspiring Expert
1,483 Views
Message 8 of 8

Re: In the interests of being open and honest...

Hey @MrBusiness

 

People who contribute here definitely care about issues like this. You got a pretty informative answer from @Jo93 (thanks @Jo93! I learned something from that post!). Chances are good that if you look up open ports they'll match with IANA registrations or apps / services that are identifiable from the web. It would be more convenient if BT published them for the world so add me to your list of supporters if you take this up directly.

 

Forgive the irrelevance of this comment, but asking for an "open conversation" on one line and saying "just don't post" is too funny. Observationally, open conversations are built on trust and the absence of fear. Respond and build on what you like, say thanks for what you might pass on. I'd highly recommend Ed Catmull's Creativity Inc as it's a good read generally and talks about open conversations and creativity.

 

What you got, as a new contributor was a helpful message clarifying expectations from a well established and generous contributor. "Thanks" would be perfect.

 

Cheers

P.