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bigshorty
Beginner
1,345 Views
Message 1 of 6

Incorrect phone socket wiring query

Hi All

 

I have a query regarding how a home phone socket should be wired up as mine doesn't look right to me and as it was wired up by BT thought this would be the best place to ask to help / advice. I'll explain my setup as best as I can but not being that technically minded, there's a chance I might miss something or not explain myself well enough, so please bear with me.

 

The reason I'm querying the wiring of my phone socket is due to having broadband droputs that affect my download speeds. I was asked by my ISP to plug my router directly into the test socket of my phone line for a few days. I only have the bog standard phone socket that a microfilter is plugged into, but when I removed the faceplate with the phone line socket, I noticed the incoming phone line wiring was not connected to it. Instead it's connected to the test socket mounting / bracket. From pictures I've seen on the internet the phone line socket faceplate should be connected to the incoming phone line wiring, but mine isn't, I can just undo the screws of the faceplate and pull the faceplate away from the test socket bracket. Is this correct, or should incoming wiring be connected to the faceplate?

 

I'd be grateful if someone could confirm whether this is correct, or explain why this is not correct if in fact it isn't.

 

I look forward to any responses and many thanks in advance.

0 Ratings
5 REPLIES 5
licquorice
Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
1,329 Views
Message 2 of 6

Re: Incorrect phone socket wiring query

Extension wiring terminates on the removable faceplate, not the incoming wiring, that is the whole point of it. Removing the faceplate completely isolates your internal wiring from the incoming line thus providing a demarcation point for fault finding. How would the test socket work if the incoming wiring was terminated on the part you had just disconnected?

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iniltous
Guru
1,316 Views
Message 3 of 6

Re: Incorrect phone socket wiring query

Seems you have things confused, the line is connected to the part of the master socket that remains on the wall,( you cannot normally see the line terminations ( marked as A and B) ...extension wiring if any exists should be on the removable 'consumer' panel, as already explained, disassembling the socket removes the extension wiring from the line, so any fault on the extension wiring can be easily isolated from the line itself, reassembly reconnects extension wiring /sockets back onto the line.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=df5QNpPzom8

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bigshorty
Beginner
1,301 Views
Message 4 of 6

Re: Incorrect phone socket wiring query

Many thanks for the replies, even though the explanations have gone over my head a bit, as I said, I'm not that technically minded. But from the replies you have sent me, with this being the only phone socket in my home, and there being no extensions, I'm assuming that the fact that there are no wires connected to the faceplate of my socket is how it should be? I have added a couple of photos just to show you my set up, perhaps you wouldn't mind telling me that this is how it should be. I looked at the youtube video, and there are wires connected to the faceplate, why would this be?

Sorry for having to ask such basic questions, don't mean to be such a novice!IMG_0847.JPGIMG_0848.JPG

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licquorice
Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
1,294 Views
Message 5 of 6

Re: Incorrect phone socket wiring query

Exactly how it should be. The only reason to connect wires to the removable faceplate is to connect extension sockets.

pottyperson
Distinguished Guru
Distinguished Guru
1,277 Views
Message 6 of 6

Re: Incorrect phone socket wiring query

A brief explanation from a fellow non-techie might help you understand it better. Think of the the test socket as the end of the fixed link to your property. With no extensions, the faceplate is effectively just an adaptor which plugs into the test socket to act as a cover with a socket for routine use.

 

Any extensions would be wired to the faceplate. Removing it to access the test socket then isolates everything beyond the fixed link, helping to establish the location of a fault. (Note that you have to use the test socket if there's a fault even if you have no extensions because the faceplate itself could be the cause. If that ever happens, be prepared for an argument as to whether it's down to you or Openreach.)

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