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peterd123
Aspiring Contributor
1,881 Views
Message 1 of 33

Infinity????

I keep getting letters and leaflets saying that I can get "up to 35meg" as I now have fibre optic. This is absolute rubbish. There is no fibre optic in the road at all. When I phone them they tell me that the fibre optic runs to the exchange and not to my house. If this is so then the signal is only as good as the weakest link, and that is the part to my house. If they are telling me they can push 35meg along the line to my house, then they can already, without the new, so called fibre optic. I have seen leaflets stuck on the side of the green box that is in some roads, saying that fibre optic is here. This is rubbish as well, as there has been no road works or digging up of the pavement to the box. So how did they suddenly get the fibre optic in the box. Perhaps they are magicians. Come on BT, we are not all idiots, like you think we are.

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32 REPLIES 32
bbcol
Contributor
1,875 Views
Message 2 of 33

Re: Infinity????

No your wrong.

 

The copper line is shorter so there is less distance for the signal to be lost and noise introduced.

 

Travelling from manchester to london at 30mph all the way takes longer than on the motorway for 90% of the journey doesn't it?

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peterd123
Aspiring Contributor
1,869 Views
Message 3 of 33

Re: Infinity????

Look BT cannot give me a reasonably constant 6 meg on my line. So how can they give me up to 35 meg without changing the existing line beats me. Where ever I  have seen true fibre optic, it goes to the door of the house and you can see where they have installed it in the pavement. "Only as strong as the weakest link" 

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Guru
1,866 Views
Message 4 of 33

Re: Infinity????

What does it say when you put your number into the checker?
http://www.productsandservices.bt.com/consumerProducts/displayTopic.do?topicId=29017&s_cid=con_FURL_...

Fibre mostly gets blown through ducts etc, so you wouldn't necessarily see much road works etc.

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peterd123
Aspiring Contributor
1,858 Views
Message 5 of 33

Re: Infinity????

I'm sorry, but I just cannot believe the hype. When you or Virgin Media install the fibre optic to my door, then I may think about it. But you cannot convince me that this is not just a case of BT lifting their foot off the brake so to speak, so as to make it appear faster.

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Distinguished Sage
1,857 Views
Message 6 of 33

Re: Infinity????

Bacause with Infinity the connection os provided from the cab which is considerably closer than the exchange. I got 2meg on ADSL, I get 80 on Infinity
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Guru
1,852 Views
Message 7 of 33

Re: Infinity????

How can you appear to make speeds faster???
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bbcol
Contributor
1,841 Views
Message 8 of 33

Re: Infinity????

You realise that most people on this forum dont work for BT and are actually infinity customers?

 

Did you read my road analogy?

 

Just because in the past cable has always been to the door, that doesn't mean it is the only way to do it.  FTTC means "Fibre to the cabinet" by the way.  So instead of miles and miles of copper to your house from the exchange, its fibre from exchange to the cabinet on your street, then only the slow copper for the end distance, hence not ripping your pavements up outside your house.

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robh66
Contributor
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Message 9 of 33

Re: Infinity????

The idea behind the Infinity service and higher speeds is the fact apart from the fibre cable running from the exchange to the new DSLAM cab, but also the equipmnent within that cab is what is currently providing you with your ADSL2 service all the way from the exchange.

 

And as an example when i was on ADSL2 i was getting 2.5Meg, the Infinity line speed checker said i would get 30Meg on the Download and 10Meg on the Upload. When in fact i got a very stable 35 - 37Meg on the download based on the time of day and a consistant 8Meg on the Upload.

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snowy2010
Aspiring Expert
1,834 Views
Message 10 of 33

Re: Infinity????

Peter - You are wrong on many levels i'm afraid!  The introduction of Infinity isn't some kind of conspiracy theory with BT secretly being able to deliver these speeds on ADSL all this time!  BT haven't "lifted their foot off the brake" - they have installed a new infrastructure!

 

There are very few places in the UK that have FTTP (Fibre To The Premises) - When you say "Where ever I  have seen true fibre optic, it goes to the door of the house and you can see where they have installed it in the pavement."  I presume you are refering to Virgin Media's offering?  If so,  it isn't fibre optic that is installed to the door (in the pavement) - It is good old fashioned coaxial cable (similar to your TV aerial cable).   Basically all fibre providers (including the Infinty product and Virgin Media's offering) works as follows :

 

A fibre optic line is run from a central distribution point  (such as you local exchange)  to a a nearby local distribution point,  a metal cabinet near your property in other words.  This then connects to your house via a short run of either coaxial cable (Virgin) or copper cable (BT).

 

The problem that causes reduced speeds over any form of wired electromagnetic transmission method is signal degradation due to noise and loss.  This noise and loss is largely dependant on the length of the wire carrying the signal.   The higher the speed pumped down the line - the more sensitive the signal is to noise/loss.  This sets the practical limits of ADSL speeds.

 

For example :  If your local telephone exchange is 3 miles away then the ADSL signal reaching you over copper wires has to travel 3 miles (or more) to reach you - Compare this to a BT Infinty signal that only has to travel a couple of hundred feet from your nearest cab.  It is obvious which run of cable is going to suffer the least noise/inteference/loss and therfore obvious which one will support the highest speeds.

 

The above explanations are very much simplified but, in a nutshell :

 

1.  The longer a run of cable is,  the more a signal will degrade and the slower that signal must be in order to remain useable.

 

2.  The BT FTTC (Infinity) product replaces miles of copper cable with a very short run measured in feet and can therefore pump a faster signal directly into your house!

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