cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
Distinguished Guru
5,080 Views
Message 71 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution
Yes there is, it allows someone to hack WPA2.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
If you found this post helpful, please click on the star on the left
If not, I'll try again 🙂
0 Ratings
Highlighted
Distinguished Guru
5,073 Views
Message 72 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

@Guybrush_Threepwood wrote:

Hi All,

 

Why have BT removed the "WPS" facility from their modems?

 

It certainly make's me think? WPS makes things easier to set up. Is there a security flaw with WPS?


This was asked recently and it transpires that BT have actually started to enable WPS again. Copied from this post - http://community.bt.com/t5/Other-BB-Queries/WPS-no-longer-gets-disabled-by-BT/m-p/778266#M44114

 

We recently started to switch on the WPS functionality on our Hub 3’s.  It is being rolled out over the next few months so some hubs have had this enabled already but it will take a while to have this rolled out across all hub 3.0s. 

 

Rest assured that we would not be doing this if there were any security concerns in switching on WPS.

-+-No longer a forum member-+-
0 Ratings
Aspiring Contributor
5,028 Views
Message 73 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

Screen Shot 2013-02-19 at 14.05.27.pngI know what it feels like!! My street is crowded with HUB3's !!! Did all customers with BT with older homehubs get a free hub 3?  I have just joined BT a few weeks ago!! BT infinity Rocks!

0 Ratings
Highlighted
Guru
5,026 Views
Message 74 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

Haha, I don't have 1 Hub next to me lol. Advantage of living in the countryside! 😄

If this helped you please click the Star beside my name.

If this answered your question please click "Mark as Accepted Solution" below.
0 Ratings
Highlighted
Aspiring Expert
4,673 Views
Message 75 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

Hi all,

 

I know this is a bit of an old thread but I'm a new poster and I thought I'd share my opinions and help here.  I'm a WLAN consultant and have the HH3 at home (as well as a few other wireless access points and routers).

 

After reading all of the posts in this thread I think it would be helpful to clear up a few things which may be causing some users issues with their wireless connection.  I'm talking about 2.4GHz (802.11b/g/n) specifically here, so 5GHz shouldn't be considered.  I apologise in advance if anyone feels upset by anything I've said which may contradict the views of others - please remember I'm only offering help from my own experience and knowledge in wireless LAN systems.

 

1] 802.11n ONLY works (as per the standard) when using WPA2/AES.  This is the most common reason for clients not connecting at anything faster than 54Mbps.  If you're using TKIP, forget it.  You shouldn't be using TKIP now anyway - it's easily cracked as it's based on the same cipher as WEP!

 

2] WiFi is only physically capable of delivering speeds which are less than half of the radio link speed.  So, if your NIC says you're connected at 144Mbps, you can only hope to achieve around 70Mbps - EVER.  The same is true for all frequencies, whether using 802.11n or not.  Don't confuse this though - if your link speed is 144Mbps and your Infinity WAN speed is 70Mbps, you should be able to achieve a speed test pretty close to that providing your wireless connection is performing under optimal conditions (ie. No interference, close range to the HH3, maximum data-rate, etc).  I'd be a little more conservative though and accept around 50-60Mbps as optimal.

 

3] Wireless does not 'burst' traffic.  If your signal fluctuates, that indicates a problem.  The most likely issue is antenna orientation in the client device, but can also be caused by a number of different factors including interference from other 2.4GHz equipment in the same area.

 

4] 2.4GHz (or 802.11b/g) should NOT use 40MHz channels at 802.11n.  Vendors such as Cisco have removed this functionality from their kit as this actually has a negative effect on throughput in congested areas.  This means 802.11n in the 2.4GHz band will only be capable of 150Mbps radio link (marketed as that but actually only 144Mbps).

 

5] Having the correct driver for your NIC is important.  If you have an out-of-date driver your NIC might not support some features which are designed to make the link more reliable or faster, whereas if you have the newest beta driver, for example, it might have lots of issues which haven't been fixed yet.  Sometimes you have to try 3 or 4 drivers before you find one which helps your NIC to perform as best it can.

 

6] Don't sit too close to the HH3.  This may sound counter-intuitive, but if you sit too close it can have a negative impact.

 

I had a TP-Link WLAN router which gave me the option to use 802.11b/g, 802.11n or all 3.  I could choose 20MHz or 40Mhz channel-widths for 802.11n which would give me a 300Mbps radio link.  If I used the wireless during the day it was fine, up until around 5 or 6pm, then it completely died.  Speed tests were shocking and I could barely maintain a link.  However if I changed the router to use 20MHz channel-widths it was better.  It wasn't perfect, but I could at least maintain a link and get around a 10-15Mbps speed test.  This behaviour is because 802.11n uses channel-bonding to combine two 20MHz channels to achieve greater throughput.  However, doing that also increases the chances of interference causing issues as you're now open to interference on two channels, not one.  In an area where there are no other 2.4GHz devices that's great, but in a congested street where every house now has 2.4GHz kit, it's a bad idea.  I like to think of 802.11n offering more reliability, with extra bandwidth as a bonus.

 

I can only conclude that the HH3 is fit-for-purpose based on my own experience of using the product.  Sure, it may not perform as well as other devices, but that doesn't make it not-fit-for-purpose, it just makes it something I'd be less likely to use.

 

I've not seen anything here to suggest that the OPs HH3 isn't functioning correctly, apart from the initial speed-test.  However that initial speed test has been contradicted by subsequent speed tests, which leads me to believe that the HH3 isn't faulty, and that environmental factors such as interference are causing issues.

 

Hope that helps someone at least Smiley Happy

Highlighted
Aspiring Expert
4,660 Views
Message 76 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

Either BT should ensure their hub is top notch or allow connection via third party routers. I have a spare n router at home from some time ago, but I believe BT Broadband can only be connected through their own equipment.

0 Ratings
Highlighted
Expert
4,653 Views
Message 77 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

@het_uk - Totally agree with you. I have been saying this to most people with wifi issues here.

 

@aremeza - There are plenty of 3rd party routers that work with Infinity.

0 Ratings
Highlighted
Beginner
4,472 Views
Message 78 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

By the way, I noticed that my WiFi goes to pot when i have the microwave on. I don't know whether it's a problem generally or if I have a dodgy leaking microwave, but if the OP was heating up his soup when running the speedtest it may have caused a dip in performance.

0 Ratings
Highlighted
Aspiring Contributor
4,358 Views
Message 79 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution
Thought I would share this:- I now have a gigabit internal LAN (using a TPlink gig switch - I stupidly threw away a perfectly good one from Netgear thinking it wasn't compatible with the home hub!!!) - Now I have a WD Mybooklive as local cloud storage, using the gig switch for best throughput to my PC on Gig, a laptop on wifi, and to old Mac systems on 10/100.... Here's the interesting bit: I found that if I try to use more than one physical port on the HH3, No not use, just have connected, like a mac plugged in to 10/100 and the WDMBlive on Gig, THEN the wifi DROPS OUT - I didn't believe this, but plugged the MAc into the gig switch - all ok... over a month or more .... try again - same thing ... try to save ports on the gig switch and USE the HH3 ports - no chance. It doesn't matter which ONE port you use, but only use ONE PORT and wifi to the WDMBLive will be ok.....use more than one and the wifi will like as not drop out..... Also my missus uses the MAC and she gets cross if he can't get her web browser.... so I now have her on my internal LAN and one just port on that connects to the wifi connection HH3 - just don't call it a home hub anymore - it is no way a hub. This isn't 100percent conclusive but ....I can't think how else the logic of this is.....
0 Ratings
Highlighted
Aspiring Expert
4,341 Views
Message 80 of 100

Re: It's Official BT HomeHub 3 is not fit for purpose!

Go to solution

@aremeza - BT do allow connection to their Infinity and ADSL services via any router, as long as that router supports the PPPoA protocol for ADSL, and the PPPoE protocol for Infinity.

 

I have a Cisco 1841 router connected to the Openreach Infinity modem at the moment, so no HH3 whatsoever, and it works perfectly.

 

I had a TP-Link ADSL2+ router connected to the ADSL service before that, and it worked fine too!

0 Ratings