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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 11 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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The problem relating to the DHCP server originated a long time ago, when people were having problems with making any port mappings stick, for things like remote IP cameras.

 

They used the option on the earlier hubs to "always use this IP address", but it kept forgetting it, and they would lose contact with the IP camera.

The only solution was to use IP addresses outside of the DHCP range.

 

The option on the hub 6 to use a static IP address, is intended for devices that use DHCP, so it does not help if the DHCP server decides to forget it.

 

I did see that option on the hub 6 menu, but I suspected that it would make no difference to the problem.

 

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Message 12 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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The Home Hub 5 and Smart Hub 6 are basic routing devices and in my opinion are inadequate for anything but configuring the simplest of home networks as people have found.  The attempt to provide IP address reservation by "saving static IP" doesn't always work and if it doesn't work consistently it is next to useless!

 

The BT Hub's are designed to work "out of the box" with little or no configuration and they do this very well.

 

If you want to do something a little more advanced then I suggest you purchase a "proper" router such as a Netgear.  These have many advanced routing options including the ability to setup a list of devices and allocate IP addresses to them as part of the DHCP configuration.  This is commonly known as IP address reservation and enables you to assign the same IP address to a device without having to configure that device with a static IP address.  Every device has a unique MAC address, so by maintaining a list of MAC addresses and associated IP addresses, the router can allocate the same IP address each time the device connects to the router.

 

I have two dual band Netgear wireless routers around my house to provide full wifi coverage.  Because both routers are broadcasting the same SSID (on each band), devices auto connect to whichever has the strongest signal.

 

The BT Smart Hub is configured to provide only internet access (no wifi or DHCP).  It is therefore being used as nothing more than a fibre modem, which it appears to be very good at.

 

If anyone requires more detailed information about how to configure a more advanced network, please ask and I can supply it.

 

 

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Aspiring Expert
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Message 13 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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@adamclacher wrote:

Would DHCP reservation be better? It is the official term,but as the BT box says about making the IP address static. I'm just using there terminology for this case. The feature described in this way makes me think it is for general use or they would of  used  ‘big boy words’ if it was designed with businesses and IT professionals in mind.  Sometimes to solve the problem you have to use the terminology given, even if you think it is wrong. Please contact BT if you think the terminology is not up to scratch as it has nothing to do with me

 

DHCP Static Option screen

Yes, it was mentioned by two BT helpline people. The last guy was very nice and went to check his findings. At least he actually gave me an answer for why it was not working. This is that the feature is only for businesses only (and not trying to sell me a busniess line). This means that the simplistic wording of ‘static’ in the gui menu conflicts with my thoughts that the gui was made for general users

Apparently we should not of been able to make these changes in HH4 & HH5 like we have been doing, as it was a business feature……..

 

So to fix it, the machines that I need to have a fixed IP are outside of the DHCP range making them static as they have nothing to do with the DHCP server within the BT hub. Thanks Keith for the heads up 🙂

 

 

I can not speak on Keith’s behalf, but off his comments I would assume of different versions, this might be variants, software configuration or hardware. Yeah is might not be exact, but I feel that you might be looking a little too deep into that one and he was just doing a quick reply to help out


Ok, so now I'm really confused (again). BT also told me via Twitter that only Business accounts could assign static IP's so you're not alone in that. Are you saying though, that the Hub 6 has this screen option as above that can only be utilised by Business customer ? This as I understand it is DHCP reservation....,so can we do this or not?

ALso, I understand that the solution is that I have to assign a fixed IP outside the hub's range, but how exactly do I do this? Do I do it on the hub or do I do it on the device......and again, how exactly please? I'm desperately trying to become more well versed in all of this, so apologies for all the questions.

one more thing...is there a good guide any of you would recommend where I can read up on all of this terminology and networking /wifi/router "how to"? 

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Message 14 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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Hi @Burmey,

 

A home router will have at least two interfaces. One towards the Internet and one towards your home network.

The IP address on the Internet facing interface will be a 'public' address and is the address seen when you connect to http://www.whatsmyip.org/ for example. This address is 'assigned' to your router each time the broadband line 'syncs' and will almost certainly be different each time. This is the address that BT are saying can only be static if you have a business account.

 

Your home network will use what are called 'private addresses'. These are never seen on the Internet, and for the BT hub will by default be 192.168.1.0/24. This address range provides up to 256 addresses, 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.255, though the .0 and the .255 are used for special purposes.

 

The rest of the addresses in this range you're free to do what you like with, but the following defaults exist.

 

The interface on the router facing towards your home network will have a static IP address which is 192.168.1.254 by default. The router also acts as a DHCP server for your home LAN and will assign addresses in the range of 192.168.1.63 to 192.168.1.253 to devices that request an address using DHCP. The addresses are given on a 'first come, first served' basis and can be different each time a device requests an address.

 

In the hub, once a device has requested and been assigned an IP address by DHCP, there is an option to always use the same IP address for the device. The BT hub, and indeed vendors and other routers, call this DHCP 'static' IP addressing, but I think the term 'reservation' is better. The address is still assigned by DHCP, but the specific address is reserved by the hub for use by a specific device. Note that at this time the function doesn't appear to work as it should on the Home Hub 6.

 

The rest of the addresses, between 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.62 can be assigned to devices on your network as you see fit. These addresses are truly static IP address in that the router plays no part in their assignment. The IP addresses in this range must be configured on the device itself, and so the method of doing so will vary by device type.

 

On a Windows 10 PC for example you can run ncpa.cpl from the command line, then right click the interface you're using and select Properties, and then double click 'Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP)'. In here you would change 'Obtain an IP address automatically' to 'Use the following IP address' and then enter the IP address lower than .63, the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and the Default gateway of 192.168.1.254. You would also need to specify the DNS server, which could be 192.168.1.254 if you still wanted to use DNS on the Hub, or 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 if you wanted to use Google's DNS.

 

There are numerous sites that have 'How to' guides. The site 'smallnetbuilder' has a bunch, and product reviews etc.

 

Regards

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Aspiring Expert
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Message 15 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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Thanks you SO much smf22. I think I'd pretty much got there but you've clarified all the bits that weren't adding up (and so confident that my Hub 6 wasn't working properly). Do you happen to know how to set up a static ip on an Iphone or a Home plug/wireless extender (I have a Zyxel and a TPlink), as an example?

I am going to print your reply off and keep it. I think it might be good as an independent post and added as a "sticky" as I'm sure I'm not the only one grappling with terminology and how to do these things. 

Thanks again

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Aspiring Expert
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Message 16 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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@milleniumaire

 

I'd be interested to know what Netgear routers you are using and why two. I'm still battling on with the Smart Hub for the moment.

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Message 17 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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Hi jazzguy,

 

I use the current Netgear routers in my home setup:

 

DGN4000

R7000 Nighthawk

 

Prior to getting BT Infinity a couple of years ago, these were the routers I had recently purchased and installed so I was keen to continue using them.  The Nighthawk is setup downstairs and gives an excellent wifi coverage for all the living areas and the garden.  The DGN4000 is situated in the loft bedroom (2nd floor), near to the BT Master Socket, which is supplied via copper wire from a telegraph pole (hence the 2nd floor height).  This gives good wifi coverage to all the bedrooms upstairs.

 

Both routers are configured to use the same SSID on each band, so devices see only two networks throughout the house (2.4 and 5 gHz).  The routers are also connected to the 1ghz wired network I have installed, so they can see each other.

 

The DGN4000 acts as the DHCP server and gateway to the internet, which is achieved by plugging the BT "Smart" Hub into the DGN4000 and disabling all the "Smart" features so that it is used purely as a fibre modem. 

 

The setup allows me to use the full functionality of the Netgear wifi routers including address reservation, all of which are more powerful than the BT Hub's features and the added bonus is that they work Smiley Happy

 

So, I use two routers to give me full wifi coverage around the house.  I could equally have used a single wifi router and used the BT Hub as a fibre modem only, plugged into that router.

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Aspiring Expert
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Message 18 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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@milleniumaire

 

Thanks for that. The 1 ghz wired network explains a lot. Just a bit puzzled as to why you use the BT Smart Hub at all in your set up.  

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Message 19 of 19

Re: Home hub 6 not so smart

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Hi jazzguy,

 

I have to use it as I don't have a fibre modem.  The Netgear DGN4000 has a built in ADSL2+ modem, but this is no good for fibre.

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