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Beginner
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Message 1 of 8

Suspect hacking

I am posting on behalf of a friend who thinks that her BT home hub has been hacked.  She has had suspicions for a while as a nosey neighbour always seems to know far more about her activities than he or she should do.  The person under suspicion lives very close by (ie within wifi range) and has expert IT skills.

Earlier today my friend logged onto her BT home hub manager and found a list of 5 devices on her DHCP table one of which is an ipad touch (she does not own one but her neighbour does) and another is an iphone called XXXsiphone where XXX is the first name of the person under suspicion.  Is this proof that her network has been hacked and what action should my friend now take?  The really odd thing is that when she navigated away from that part of the webpage and then went back to it, 4 of the 5 devices on the list had vansihed and the only device left was her own pc.  Can anyone explain what is going on here??

 

Any advice really appreciated.  My friends neighbour is making her life a misery.  She is now paranoid about doing any of her own investigations as she feels all her online activity and phone calls are being snooped on.

 

Thanks

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 2 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking

She should change the wireless passkey on her homehub. See link how to do that.

 

http://bt.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/14110/~/how-do-i-change-the-wep-key-for-a-wireless-co...

 

She should obviously keep a note of the new key and not tell it to anybody else.

 

When she does change it she will need to enter the new passkey into any wireless devices she has so that they can log on.

 

It is unlikely that the neighbour has hacked the passkey. It is more likely that the passkey was obtained from the label on the homehub or was given to the neighbour at sometime.

 

 

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Aspiring Expert
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Message 3 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking

has your friend got BT Fon activted.

 

if so a part of her connection can be used by anyone in the vacinity of her wifi which is totally seperate to her protected login.

 

as mentioned though its best to change her password.

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Expert
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Message 4 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking


@MrDJ wrote:

has your friend got BT Fon activted.

 

if so a part of her connection can be used by anyone in the vacinity of her wifi which is totally seperate to her protected login.

 

as mentioned though its best to change her password.


The OP stated that (s)he can see the devices listed under the "Connected Devices" part of their WLAN, which, AIUI shouldn't happen, as the FON's WLAN is firewalled off from the main WLAN.

 

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Beginner
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Message 5 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking

Hi thanks for your help. She has changed the passkey now but does the list prove that someone else was using her network as surely this is not legal?
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Expert
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Message 6 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking


@helpfulfriend wrote:
Hi thanks for your help. She has changed the passkey now but does the list prove that someone else was using her network as surely this is not legal?

Hi again,

 

Basically, as harsh as it sounds, your friend is ultimately responsible for any network activity on her account. In other words, she must take any and all reasonable measures (EG set a strong WPA2 passcode, not WEP which is easily cracked) to ensure that no unauthorised person can gain access to her internet service.

 

If an unautorised person were to gain access to her internet service and use it for illegal purposes, then it would be your friend, as the account holder, who would be held responsible.

 

All I can advise is to keep an eye on the situation from now on and if necessary, change the wireless passcode on a regular basis.

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 7 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking

Rottie, you are not right about the friend being responsible for somebody who has hacked into her account and carried out anything illegal. Look how many "famous" prosecutions there have been for hacking into somebody's accounts.

 

The fact that hacking into an account or in this case a router is illegal would mitigate her responsibility as long as it could be proved that another person did indeed hack into the account and did in do something illegal. 

 

The Communications Act 2003 section 125 might cover it

 

Dishonestly obtaining electronic communications

(1)A person who—

(a)dishonestly obtains an electronic communications service, and

(b)does so with intent to avoid payment of a charge applicable to the provision of that service,

is guilty of an offence.

 

This link also points out other offences.

 

http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/a_to_c/communications_offences/

 

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Expert
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Message 8 of 8

Re: Suspect hacking


@gg30340 wrote:

Rottie, you are not right about the friend being responsible for somebody who has hacked into her account and carried out anything illegal. Look how many "famous" prosecutions there have been for hacking into somebody's accounts.

 

The fact that hacking into an account or in this case a router is illegal would mitigate her responsibility as long as it could be proved that another person did indeed hack into the account and did in do something illegal. 

 

The Communications Act 2003 section 125 might cover it

 

Dishonestly obtaining electronic communications

(1)A person who—

(a)dishonestly obtains an electronic communications service, and

(b)does so with intent to avoid payment of a charge applicable to the provision of that service,

is guilty of an offence.

 

This link also points out other offences.

 

http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/a_to_c/communications_offences/

 


Thanks for the correction, gg. As the old saying goes "You live and learn." 🙂

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