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Aspiring Contributor
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Message 1 of 50

What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?

Hi all

 

I'm on BT Infinity 2 and I've had issues with slower connection speeds and frequent drops recently (I normally get around 70mbps but this can drop to 10-15 during peak time and 50 off-peak. BT are sending an engineer to come to my property as a line reset has helped somewhat but not completely.

 

One of the things i've tried is to plug into the test socket. To give a bit more clarity, I do not use any landlines in my home, i only use one plug which is the master socket, for my BT Hub, which is then hard-wired into my PC. I have the latest version (i believe) which is 5C.

 

So i've taken off the faceplate via the side clips, and to my surprise, what BT calls a test socket is in essence exactly the same plug that is being used when the face plate is on. The plug itself is in the lower part of the socket, but if you look at the back of the faceplate, it's essentially connected through thin metal plates into another part of the plate which plugs into the test socket itself.

So what's the difference between having the faceplate on (which in the end connects in to the test socket) and faceplate off and connecting the filter directly into the test socket?

 

I hope the above makes sense, very hard to describe via text, but in essence, from what I can see between pluggin into the normal faceplate = plugging into the test plug.

In my case, it's not made any difference to connection speeds

 

Thanks

 

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 2 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?

In your particular case, very little. However in the case of an installation with extension telephone sockets, removing the faceplate disconnects the internal wiring (which is the customer's responsibility) from the Openreach network. Extension wiring is connected to the faceplate and connects to the network via the test socket.

Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 3 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?


@Boeing100 wrote:

Hi all

 

To give a bit more clarity, I do not use any landlines in my home, i only use one plug which is the master socket, for my BT Hub, which is then hard-wired into my PC. I have the latest version (i believe) which is 5C.

 


 


Have you tried plugging a phone into the test socket via a microfilter to see if there is any noise on your phone line, as that will cause broadband problems?

 

 

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Aspiring Contributor
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Message 4 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?


@licquorice wrote:

In your particular case, very little. However in the case of an installation with extension telephone sockets, removing the faceplate disconnects the internal wiring (which is the customer's responsibility) from the Openreach network. Extension wiring is connected to the faceplate and connects to the network via the test socket.


Very interesting thank you. I'm a tenant in my flat so unsure how this was all originally setup. However I can confirm that there are telephone sockets in every room of the property (and I use none of them). So I guess taking off the faceplate would disconnect all of them. Considering that there is zero speed difference, I would then assume that there isn't any interference.

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Aspiring Contributor
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Message 5 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?


@Keith_Beddoe wrote:

@Boeing100 wrote:

Hi all

 

To give a bit more clarity, I do not use any landlines in my home, i only use one plug which is the master socket, for my BT Hub, which is then hard-wired into my PC. I have the latest version (i believe) which is 5C.

 


 


Have you tried plugging a phone into the test socket via a microfilter to see if there is any noise on your phone line, as that will cause broadband problems?

 

 


Unfortunately I do not own a landline phone so don't have one I can use to test for any noise. When I spoke to BT they said they can see on their system that there is a fault somewhere on the phone line but it can't locate where or what specifically.

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 6 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?


@Boeing100 wrote:

Unfortunately I do not own a landline phone so don't have one I can use to test for any noise. When I spoke to BT they said they can see on their system that there is a fault somewhere on the phone line but it can't locate where or what specifically.


You need a phone to try, the BT line test cannot detect high resistance connections.

 

See Why do I need a landline phone?

 

 

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Aspiring Contributor
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Message 7 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?

have just bought a landline phone so will give the quiet line test a go tonight.

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 8 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?

You should also make sure that when you are connected to the test socket that all your telephone extensions go "dead" with with no dial tone. This will ensure that you do not have "star wiring" which is not good for broadband.

Aspiring Contributor
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Message 9 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?


@gg30340 wrote:

You should also make sure that when you are connected to the test socket that all your telephone extensions go "dead" with with no dial tone. This will ensure that you do not have "star wiring" which is not good for broadband.


thank you, I will make sure to double check as well

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Aspiring Contributor
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Message 10 of 50

Re: What's the use of the test socket if it ends up being the same plug?

Ok so I did a quiet line test and no noise or crackling whatsoever. I plugged in my phone into different sockets and could hear a dial tone each time but what would happen is that once I plugged it into that particular socket, all other sockets were killed, including the one with the broadband (i.e. only one socket can be used at a time). Would that mean that it's a star wiring?

 

 

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