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D_L_
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 181 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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Surely a lower connection speed results in a higher Noise Margin not the other way around?

The higher the Noise Margin the better and will allow the line to resync to a higher speed. The line can keep getting faster up to the capabilities of the technology or the noise margin falls down to a preset threshold.
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D_L_
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 182 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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@trevor_machine wrote:

... One seems to be experiencing nothing more nor less than the speeds and connection issues I am (which is to say, rarely if ever obtaining sufficient capacity to watch YouTube clips or use the BBC's iPlayer function). He maintains that his DL speed is continuously less than 1mbs ...

 

 



Well that would likely point at a cable issue somewhere downstream that is affecting multiple lines, or an external source of inteference.

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Distinguished Sage
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Message 183 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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no the higher the noise margin the lower the connection speed 6db is the standard default setting
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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 184 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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Sorry but the normal noise margin is 6db and that gives best speed. If your noise margin increases due to connection drops or line noise or manual resets then that will result in your connection speed dropping. The higher the noise margin the lower the connection speed


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D_L_
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 185 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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The noise margin is how far above the required SNR for a given line speed the current line is.

 

Therefore if for a 6 Mbs line speed you need an SNR of 30dB and your line has an SNR of 42dB then your noise margin will be 12dB (The higher the better as you have a lot more leeway).

 

If your SNR went down to 29 the speed of 6Mbs would not be supported and you would lose your connection. Therefore a preset leeway (in this case 6dB) is required. You will find that a higher speed like 7Mbs requires an SNR of say 32dB therefore the 42dB would still support this with a 10dB noise margin. The line could resync to this higher speed without hitting the preset 6dB minimum. It needs this leeway as the noise will change during the day by about 2~4dB so it makes sure you don't hit the required SNR for that speed.

 

If you do you'll drop the connection or get high errors and the line will drop down to a lower speed.

 

Therefore the SNR is a natural product of the line and the higher the better it gives you a higher noise margin and the line speed can ramp up higher.

 

ANything higher than 6dB will give you the best speed and the higher the better. A high margin but lower than maximum connection speed means the line hasn't reprofiled to the correct speed. A maximum speed connection with a high noise margin is the very best as it means the technology iss the limiting factor and upgrades to the technology will give you even better results (assuming still on copper).

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Distinguished Sage
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Message 186 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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you are confusing noise margin and signal to noise ratio
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D_L_
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 187 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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It is directly SNR related. Noise margin is the total SNR minus the required SNR for that line. That is why it is called the margin.

It is a little confusing being called "noise margin" but that is just shorthand.

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 188 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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Bt sets normal noise margin at 6db and all the routers report the margin not the ratio. So a normal set of router stats will show a noise margin of about 6db The higher the noise margin reported by the router the lower the connection speed


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Distinguished Sage
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Message 189 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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this is however hijacking the posters thread and problem
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trevor_machine
Aspiring Expert
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Message 190 of 264

Re: latest garbage from BT support - the "fault threshold" get-out

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Connection just cut out. Some stats:

 

Line state:Connected
Connection time:0 days, 00:02:52
Downstream:864 Kbps
Upstream:448 Kbps
 
ADSL Settings
VPI/VCI:0/38
Type:PPPoA
Modulation:G.992.1 Annex A
Latency type:Interleaved
Noise margin (Down/Up):9.8 dB / 21.0 dB
Line attenuation (Down/Up):49.8 dB / 31.5 dB
Output power (Down/Up):17.5 dBm / 12.3 dBm
FEC Events (Down/Up):52 / 0
CRC Events (Down/Up):0 / 0
Loss of Framing (Local/Remote):0 / 0
Loss of Signal (Local/Remote):0 / 0
Loss of Power (Local/Remote):0 / 0
HEC Events (Down/Up):0 / 0
Error Seconds (Local/Remote):7889 / 2016
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