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WarrenCabral
Beginner
4,995 Views
Message 1 of 4

someone wants to take over your line

I receieved a phone call and letter from BT today saying someone wanted to take over my line.  The other party was identified as Vodafone. I said that I had never given any such instruction to either BT or Vodafone and that Vodafone is not entitled to represent to BT that I gave Vodafone any authority to speak for me or change accounts. That would be a fraud.  The bit that worried me most was that the letter from BT stated that if I did not contact BT by 17 September they would assume I intended to cancel my contract.  That is not a legally allowable assumption to make.  Silence from me does not entitle BT to cancel a contract, particularly where the process was started by an unauthorised third party, in this case Vodafone.  I am a lawyer and contract law generally does not allow third parties to interfere with contracts, and usually does not allow silence from one of the contract parties to end or alter the contract.  I bet BT did not pass that letter by its internal lawyers. Anyway, the situation has wasted a lot of my time and caused a lot of worry.  The BT staff were however very nice and said the error was at the Vodafone end, in that they inputted a wrong number in the local area phone number allocations, which they have now corrected.  But still, before accepting any such request from Vodafone, the system should require proof from the current owner that they had authorised Vodafone.

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3 REPLIES 3
iniltous
Recognised Expert
4,981 Views
Message 2 of 4

Re: Someone wants to take over your line

You seem to be irked by something that is not of BT's doing, Ofcom , the industry regulator , deemed ,  as a way to encourage and aid consumers to switch providers easily, came up with this 'gaining provider led' , way of migrating from one provider to another, the customer switching doesn't have to speak to their old provider at all, just the company they want to move to, the gaining provider serves notice to the old provider on the consumers behalf.

If , either by mistake, or with malicious intent, someone uses  your address, then it's possible that you could be 'slammed' , a change of provider without your consent....that's why the losing provider sends a 'sorry to see you go' type letter/email, detailing the procedure to follow if you didn't instigate the change of provider.

You may question the legality of this, but you would be wasting your time and money should you try to challenge a system that was set up by Ofcom and that all providers that use Openreach's network have to follow.

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-Richie-
Guru
4,987 Views
Message 3 of 4

Re: someone wants to take over your line


@WarrenCabralwrote:

I receieved a phone call and letter from BT today saying someone wanted to take over my line.  The other party was identified as Vodafone. I said that I had never given any such instruction to either BT or Vodafone and that Vodafone is not entitled to represent to BT that I gave Vodafone any authority to speak for me or change accounts. That would be a fraud.  The bit that worried me most was that the letter from BT stated that if I did not contact BT by 17 September they would assume I intended to cancel my contract.  That is not a legally allowable assumption to make.  Silence from me does not entitle BT to cancel a contract, particularly where the process was started by an unauthorised third party, in this case Vodafone.  I am a lawyer and contract law generally does not allow third parties to interfere with contracts, and usually does not allow silence from one of the contract parties to end or alter the contract.  I bet BT did not pass that letter by its internal lawyers. Anyway, the situation has wasted a lot of my time and caused a lot of worry.  The BT staff were however very nice and said the error was at the Vodafone end, in that they inputted a wrong number in the local area phone number allocations, which they have now corrected.  But still, before accepting any such request from Vodafone, the system should require proof from the current owner that they had authorised Vodafone.


It's a mistake, someone wanting services from Vodafone gave your address, as such BT sent you notification by email, sms and letter, this is the reason it takes 14 days to switch providers.

BT can't legally block such requests and force you to remain a customer, It's quite common that people move home and forget to move or cancel services, so blocking it would stop the new tennant/occupier obtaining services, that is what a working line takeover is, someone taking over the line, which is different to an advice of transfer.

Chances are you have a new neighbour who isn't familiar with their new address or maybe someone wanting to switch made a typo in the order

 

It's now been stopped as you said, so no harm done Smiley Happy

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gg30340
Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
4,947 Views
Message 4 of 4

Re: someone wants to take over your line

A request was made by Vodafone to BT take over your line and as a "check"  or in your words " the system should require proof from the current owner that they had authorised Vodafone" , BT contacted you to inform you of this.

You responded to BT that you did not instigate the line take over and as a result BT stopped the take over and on investigation it is found the fault is with Vodafone.

Can you explain what your complaint about BT is?

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