cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
jamthesun
Aspiring Contributor
4,390 Views
Message 1 of 14

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

I just triped over this new wi-fi product from BT. Due to launch in a couple of weeks. The information on BT's website is very top level. Is there anything around that gives more information on exactly what it is, how it works, features etc?

0 Ratings
Reply
13 REPLIES 13
Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
4,385 Views
Message 2 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

0 Ratings
Reply
Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
4,382 Views
Message 3 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

Yep, just a bunch of wireless repeaters, so garbage in garbage out. Discrete Ethernet wired WAPS are the best way to go to increase coverage.

0 Ratings
Reply
jamthesun
Aspiring Contributor
4,370 Views
Message 4 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

Ah repeaters, bit disappointing. I thought it might be a mesh solution like the Eero or one of the other new solutions.

 

Wired APs would be nice but just not very practical in my house.

0 Ratings
Reply
smf22
Recognised Expert
4,366 Views
Message 5 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

Little detail, but for that price you would hope they're more than simple repeaters or autonomous AP.

 

You might want to take a look at the Ubiquiti Unifi AP (UAP) product. They offer a controller based solution with true 'roaming' capability so the client is automatically switched to the AP offering the strongest signal. There are 802.11N and 802.11AC versions with three N AP coming in at around £160.

 

Regards

0 Ratings
Reply
jamthesun
Aspiring Contributor
4,362 Views
Message 6 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

I have had a look at the Ubiquiti solution. It sound very good but I can't find anything that explains how to set up the system - how many of the APs need to be wired for example? All of them or one? Does it create a mesh or are they discrete APs?

 

If you have any more info I'd be grateful to see it.

0 Ratings
Reply
varkanoid
Aspiring Expert
4,348 Views
Message 7 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

ahhh so now we know why the HH6 Wifi is so pants lately. So people buy this product !

 

 

0 Ratings
Reply
smf22
Recognised Expert
4,331 Views
Message 8 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi


@jamthesun wrote:

I have had a look at the Ubiquiti solution. It sound very good but I can't find anything that explains how to set up the system - how many of the APs need to be wired for example? All of them or one? Does it create a mesh or are they discrete APs?

 

If you have any more info I'd be grateful to see it.


They can run as discrete AP or as a mesh (WiFi repeater). It's always best to avoid WiFi repeater as you do lose speed with this configuration.

 

Have a search on YouTube for 'Extending Wifi With UniFi AC Lite' and there's a video showing setup and some of the features.

 

Regards

0 Ratings
Reply
jamthesun
Aspiring Contributor
4,292 Views
Message 9 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

Maybe I'm missing something here. I thought a repeater and a mesh were different. In a repeater layout the connections between nodes is point to point and a repeater node simply rebroadcasts the signal. In a mesh, nodes communicate with all nearby nodes and transmit their own signal. I undesrstood that mesh networks give a higher throughput.

 

Isn't that the point of Google wifi, Eero etc?

0 Ratings
Reply
smf22
Recognised Expert
4,268 Views
Message 10 of 14

Re: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi

Repeater is probably a poor choice of words.

 

You're correct in that a mesh network has some intelligence behind it and the APs communicate with each other. But essentially an AP that is not connected to the wired network has to 'pass' received client traffic onto a 'backhaul' WiFi signal towards an AP that is connected to the wired network.

 

The mesh APs may be intelligent enough to use a different channel for the backhaul, but given that two devices cannot use the same channel at the same time, and there are only so many available WiFi channels, the performance of a mesh network is not going to be as good as when all the APs are wired.

 

At the end of the day mesh networks will have advantages and disadvantages. They're simple to setup and can be easily expanded without the need for cabling, but passing client traffic between APs will add latency and, and as they have to reserve some WiFi bandwidth for the backhaul, the result is less bandwidth available to the client.

 

Regards