cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
yorgos
Aspiring Contributor
2,409 Views
Message 1 of 24

BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

Since October 2014 I have upgraded my BT from the original BT broadband standard 28 infinity now I never had a problem with my BT broadband since upgrading to BT infinity I've had nothing but problems loss of connection constantly at one point the connection dropped out 42 times in one day. After more calls to BT than you can shake a stick at and many many conversations with my new friends in India who have by the way no idea what they are doing as they are purely reading from a script. All they seem to be doing is running through the same process over and over again where I have to check my end they check they then send out an engineer engineer fine is nothing Internet checks property engineer fine is nothing they then send someone out from rain team rain team person cannot find anything problem persists rain team person says he's fixed problem problem okay for two days problem back again. Somebody please help me as I'm so willing to leave BT right now it really really hasn't been the best experience and I just want to leave them but I've got a horrible feeling they will say to me I've got to pay out the rest of my contract. Unfortunately this has cost me dearly where I have to clock out of work to speak to BT take time off to be at home for BT the proper never get resolved and in the end before when I thought that resolved the problem they only offered me one months free broadband and a £10 credit on my account it's a total joke. I'm totally fed up with BT I just want the problem fixed or I'd like to leave I dearly because I can just see this ongoing very dismayed.

Many thanks
Chris georgiou

0 Ratings
Reply
23 REPLIES 23
Moderator
Moderator
2,398 Views
Message 2 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

Hi Chris,

 

Welcome to the forum and thanks for posting. I’m really sorry you’re having problems with the connection. I’ll be happy to lend a hand with this. Can you please drop me an email with the details. You’ll get the ‘contact us’ link in my profile.

 

Cheers

 

David

Community ModeratorDaveM
Did you get the help you needed?
Help others by clicking on ‘Mark as accepted solution’
Show your appreciation!
Click on the star next to a reply to say thanks
Help guide to using the community? Click below
Kudos”Kudos”
0 Ratings
Reply
yorgos
Aspiring Contributor
2,385 Views
Message 3 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

Hi dave ive already submitted another complaint with bt and just keep gettin india contact me with no real resoloution everything seems to be we have to call me at home so check my broudband and do tests, the tests that ive done around 100 times

 

im sick to deth of bt and all this and speaking to india all the time i wish someone in charge in the uk would actually contact me .

0 Ratings
Reply
Distinguished Sage
2,381 Views
Message 4 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

IF you contact DavidM on the link he has posted then the mod team who are UK based will take personal ownership of your problem and give you a single point of UK Contact
0 Ratings
Reply
yorgos
Aspiring Contributor
2,362 Views
Message 5 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

ok thanks for that john

0 Ratings
Reply
Highlighted
onslow
Contributor
2,286 Views
Message 6 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!


@yorgos wrote:

I'm totally fed up with BT I just want the problem fixed or I'd like to leave I dearly because I can just see this ongoing very dismayed.


 

We're all behind you on that sentiment, Chris.  You see, fella, the trouble is Openreach. Always has been, always will be. Until we nationalise it again.  BT Openreach are the peeps who "own" what was the G.P.O. telephone infrastructure, and do the repairs on our phone lines. Or don't, as the case may be.

 

As you well know, Chris, they've been blowing our cash on soccer broadcasting rights instead of digging up the pavements and fixing those faults.  Unbelievable isn't it? Wouldn't have happened in the days of the G.P.O, I can tell you that, Chris.

 

Whereas the likes of you and me, the decent hard-working proletariat, are struggling to get a line sync, patiently waiting in for those "outsourced" engineers, who never show, to get us back online.  In the meantime, the likes of Openreach have been squandering our cash. Bankrolling the salaries of those £200,000 per week so-called soccer players!  Yes, that's £200,000 per WEEK, Chris!!   That's why our line-faults never get blinkin' fixed.  No cash left in the kitty. Simple as that. Never would have happened with the G.P.O, I can tell you that, Chris.

 

The excerpt below is from Jonathan Ford, writing yesterday in the Financial Times. 

 

Ford says float-off BT's infrastructure unit for the pension funds. But why not push the boat out and bring Openreach back where she truly belongs. Well away from the clutches of private equity-owned BT Group, and back into the protective custody of the British Government.  You and I know it makes sense, Chris.  But how do we persuade the Government?   A march on Whitehall, perhaps?

 


jonathan.ford at ft.com wrote:
Ofcom must not miss chance to rectify BT’s bungled unbundling
Openreach may have banished obvious discrimination on pricing and service: the company’s engineers cannot repair BT’s lines before those of another company. But service levels are still not great.

 

One reason is that the system does not encourage BT to invest enough in its own network. Although BT trumpets the £2.5bn it has put into superfast broadband, the reality is that group capital expenditure has been falling in most years since 2008.

 

Because Openreach’s cash flow is not ringfenced, BT has an incentive to use the subsidiary’s firepower to back projects that benefit solely its own consumer business. For instance, Openreach has assisted the group’s foray into sports broadcasting, helping BT to bid £2bn for English and European football rights over three years, programming it gives away for free to its own broadband customers. This wouldn’t matter if network standards were excellent. But they are not: London’s average broadband speeds barely exceed those of Minsk.

 

Things are similarly ambiguous when it comes to pricing. While Openreach cannot charge BT one price to access its network and rivals another, it can still shuffle prices around in ways that benefit its business. Thus in superfast broadband, an area where prices have been unregulated, it can charge a high wholesale price to everyone while keeping its own retail margins low.

 

This doesn’t matter to BT because it pays the wholesale charge to itself rather than to third parties. But it makes life harder for rivals to compete, meaning there are fewer of them. As Nick Delfas of the broker Redburn pointed out in a recent report making the case against functional separation, there are only four players in broadband. That is fewer than the “big six” that scrap in Britain’s far from perfect energy market.

 

Ofcom is seeking to deal with the margin issue by introducing regulation that is designed to prevent BT squeezing competitors. But as with all such measures, it involves spotting emerging abuses that are not always easy to catch.

 

A simpler structure would remove Openreach entirely from BT’s clutches. True, this would not be a trivial exercise: liabilities would have to be split between the two. But much of the work separating Openreach has already been done.

 

With an inflation-proofed income stream linked to economic growth, the business would be an ideal investment for pension funds. It would have none of the conflicts that bedevil functional separation on investment and pricing. True, there are benefits to having BT as an “anchor tenant” for new projects. But other countries have not found this an insuperable obstacle. Take New Zealand: it demerged the network from its telecoms incumbent nearly four years ago.

 

It is not too late to evict BT from its halfway house. But the clock is ticking. In a few years, the UK will be in a new investment cycle — for ultrafast broadband — that will constrain intervention. Meanwhile the telecoms market is consolidating. If BT takes over the mobile operator EE, the group (including Openreach) will control more than half the cash flow in UK telecoms. Thirty years after privatisation, this is not where Britain ought to be.

 


0 Ratings
Reply
nomad2k3
Aspiring Expert
2,250 Views
Message 7 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

Have to agree, 4 months of battling to get my service restored and they finally tell me they cant, and cant explain as to why they cant because every test under the sun comes back fine.  Smiley Very Happy

 

So ive (like many others) have taken a speed drop. Smiley Very Happy

 

Then now 4 days later it drops again by another whopping margin. Smiley Very Happy

 

from 60 to 20  Smiley Very Happy

 

 

Sorry for all the smileys, my sanity is suffering.

0 Ratings
Reply
yorgos
Aspiring Contributor
2,110 Views
Message 8 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

Still not had corrispondance lol what a joke.

ive got 2 e mails saying bt have tried to call me but no missed calls on my i phone and no e mails ???????????

can anyone advise how i can now leave bt please, !!!!

0 Ratings
Reply
Distinguished Guru
2,106 Views
Message 9 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

If you migrate to another ISP you will have to pay to the end of your current contract. If you don't want to pay you will have to wait until the end of your contract to leave.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
If you found this post helpful, please click on the star on the left
If not, I'll try again 🙂
0 Ratings
Reply
yorgos
Aspiring Contributor
2,096 Views
Message 10 of 24

Re: BT IS A JOKE HONESTLY!! INFINITY USELESS!!!!!!!

i would like to go to another provider as ive been constantly messed around fo over 4 months now still not getting what ive been paying for !!

im going to be contacting the financial ombudsman now

0 Ratings
Reply