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Message 11 of 15

Re: Broadband Availability Checker / Contract Speeds / Ofcom Codes of Practice

EE do still offer FibrePlus, I just checked and can order as a new customer.

 


@SobsPhonewrote:
EE have refused to supply any specifics or any information about my line speed. Therefore also no information about my contractual minimum in relation to the Ofcom Code of Pratice.

It's listed on the EE website Regulatory and Codes of Practice and you will have an order confirmation from the last renewal with your personalised speeds, each house is different, each speed estimate is different.

 


@SobsPhonewrote:
I have an OpenReach office near me. Going to pop in and speak to them about who sets the Handback value which the Ofcom Code of Practice seems to be based on.

The ISP set them, if you're a new customer you get an estimated speed, existing customers will be based off observed speeds, each time a contract is entered into will see you given an estimated speed and a minimum guarantee, in regards to contacting Openreach, they will refer you to your communication provider which is EE, Openreach are not public facing, their customers are the 600+ communication providers they sell to

 

 

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Message 12 of 15

Re: Broadband Availability Checker / Contract Speeds / Ofcom Codes of Practice

Hello, thanks to everyone who responded.

I believe I am now closer to getting a better pitcure of what is happening.

I am being told that EE does not accept customers whose internet speeds are at the lower end of  given product. For exmple on a product that has an internet speed range of 40mgps - 70mgps EE might not accept anyone whose line speed is below 50mgps. This will allow EE to calculate that their customer 'average speed' is higher than the 'average' would be if customers with slower speeds were included.

It looks as if slower speed customers are forced to use other BT Group providers, such as BT UK.

If true, this would explain why, even though my line speed is still within their FibrePlus speed range and that my line speed is still above the minimum guaranteed line speed, EE are refusing to renew my contract for FibrePlus and have given no specific details as to why.

Worth also noting EE have just been named as 'best internet provider' with customers having an 'average speed' higher than any other provider. BT UK and Plus net, also part of the BT Group who use the same network, were not mentioned at all and did not make it onto the leader board.

If all true probably should be investigated by Ofcom.

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Message 13 of 15

Re: Broadband Availability Checker / Contract Speeds / Ofcom Codes of Practice

TBH , it’s pointless discussing an EE issue on this BT Consumer forum ,

but if you are already on Fibre Plus , then you cannot regrade to Fibre Plus as you are already on it …if you have mistakenly posted, and   you called EE to re-contract rather than regrade , and they refused to re contract you on Fibre Plus and would only re-contract you on their basic ‘Fibre Broadband’ thats different to what you posted, but would beg the question , if your current speed is barely over basic ‘Fibre Broadband’ speed of 40Mb, why would you want to be on Fibre Plus anyway , that’s assuming that EE Fibre Plus is more expensive than their basic ‘EE Fibre Broadband’

There are dozens  of providers that use Openreach, there only 3 BT Group ISPs , so it’s nonsensical to suggest anyone is forced to use any BT Group ISP , feel unwanted by EE , simple , move to someone else 

If you line once delivered better speed than it does now , and there isn’t a fault ( presumably that’s what the fault report established ) then it’s probably the result of ‘crosstalk’ , but moving provider wouldn’t improve things

 

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Message 14 of 15

Re: Broadband Availability Checker / Contract Speeds / Ofcom Codes of Practice

I am merely reporting back the information I have managed to obtain on this particular matter.

The information I have found seems to fit with the facts, including EE being and the top of the leader board and BT not being on the leader board at all, but I do claim to have definitive, or specific, evidence on what might be happening. EE have not provided any specific information despite my requesting it.

Maybe this information will help others in some way.

Again, thank you to those who responded.

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Message 15 of 15

Re: Broadband Availability Checker / Contract Speeds / Ofcom Codes of Practice

The advertising authorities,  demanded that the way broadband speeds were advertised had to change from the ‘upto’ **Mb speed’  the equipment can provide (given the appropriate line length) to the ‘average’ speed a customer on a particular product can reasonably expect to receive from a particular ISP, by doing that they incentivise ISP to do exactly what you say , it’s not against the rules , but someone on a line that can barely exceed 40Mb , but on a 80Mb profile with negatively affect the average, so the ISP could refuse to place that customer on a higher profile, it would seem odd though that someone on a line that will only ever achieve 40Mb due to the distance their property is from the fibre cab would want to pay extra for something they  could never have.

 AFAIR, Sky started doing this type of thing years ago on ADSL ( before FTTC was widespread ) they refused to take on customers who would receive sub 2Mb speed , presumably so their adverts could state ‘ on average we are faster’  , when BT  were obligated to accept any customer who asked for service.

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