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pinkteapot
Beginner
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Message 11 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

Yup, that's what I'm thinking (as well as having to look at an unfinished master socket!). Sadly BT will be charging us £30/month for 24 months to keep an eye on whether fibre ever becomes available! Oh well... Joys of rural living. 😁

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 12 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

That cost includes the line rental and ADSL broadband, and you can upgrade, normally without any additional cost, when FTTC is available.

Once your phone line is active, you can use your number on the availability checker, as that is more accurate.

If you keep checking a couple of times a week, you should be able to see when the cabinet has capacity, and then place an upgrade order.

 

pinkteapot
Beginner
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Message 13 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

I was wondering - if we downgrade the order to phoneline only (no ADSL), which would save some money, and get 4G broadband instead... Could we then still keep an eye on the checker using our number and order fibre when it appears?

When trying to get a fibre order in quickly because there's a slot free, is there a benefit to already having ADSL in place (vs. just having a phoneline)?

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 14 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

You do not have to order ADSL, you can just order a phone line and pay the basic line rental of £19.99 a month, saving you £10.

As mobile broadband can be unreliable and expensive, I still think ADSL is worthwhile, even at a low speed. I am on ADSL 10Mbs, but started out on 500Kbs when ADSL first became available. It was so much faster than dial-up Internet.

You may find that you actually get a better connection speed than the estimate, as you are only using the address checker, and not the phone number.

You would not be restricted in the amount you can download on ADSL.

There is no advantage in having ADSL first, apart from the fact that the upgrade route, if it becomes available, may be cheaper.

pinkteapot
Beginner
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Message 15 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

Thanks! I really appreciate all the help - gives us the facts so we can decide what's best to do. 🙂 

We're coming from a house with 300Mbps Virgin cable. 😂

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 16 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

if you only take the phone then you may well get charged for the installation which is normally waived when you also take the broadband package



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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 17 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

BT should send you a home hub 4, as that is the best one to use for ADSL, especially if you are a long distance from the exchange, as the later home hubs can be unstable on a long line.

When you eventually upgrade, you will be sent a home hub 6, or a smart hub 2, as they are designed for VDSL.

Sage
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Message 18 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?


@Keith_Beddoe wrote:

You do not have to order ADSL, you can just order a phone line and pay the basic line rental of £19.99 a month, saving you £10.

As mobile broadband can be unreliable and expensive, I still think ADSL is worthwhile, even at a low speed. I am on ADSL 10Mbs, but started out on 500Kbs when ADSL first became available. It was so much faster than dial-up Internet.

You may find that you actually get a better connection speed than the estimate, as you are only using the address checker, and not the phone number.

You would not be restricted in the amount you can download on ADSL.

There is no advantage in having ADSL first, apart from the fact that the upgrade route, if it becomes available, may be cheaper.


What part of £25pm do you call expensive for unlimited data?

 

@pinkteapot Do you appearin the darker reddish area below?

2019-11-12 16_55_52-Coverage checker - Three.png

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pinkteapot
Beginner
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Message 19 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

No - one of the few lighter red splodges. 🙄

I looked at Three who do cheaper deals with unlimited data. They don't promise indoor 4G coverage. Then again, neither do EE who our mobile phones are with and we have 4G with them upstairs in the house at least... We could position a 4G router on the top floor, on the side of the house with the strongest signal...  

I guess we should however get the phoneline connected first to make absolutely sure fibre isn't available - I know DSL Checker results based on address aren't always accurate.

Thanks to @Keith_Beddoe for the tip re which model of HomeHub BT should send - I'll check the equipment when it arrives and query it with BT if they've sent a later version which may not work well on ADSL. 

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 20 of 31

Re: New-build house - fibre cabinet full - what can we do?

I think its always best to have a physical copper phone connection from an exchange, that is always available, even if there is a power cut. Always keep a wired phone handy for emergencies,

Mobile signals can be very unreliable, and the signal level is reduced, as more users are connected to the mast. This has the effect of reducing your actual connection speed.

This is a form of traffic control that the mobile operators use to manage the bandwidth, so you may see a signal level drop during peak times.

The problem with the later home hubs, is that they have a very wide bandwidth which is needed for VDSL. This means that on a long line, there is more likely to be interference which would normally be out of the range of the HH4, but can cause the later home hubs to lose sync, and take a while to re-connect.

 

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