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Burmey
Aspiring Expert
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Message 1 of 18

Accuracy of stats on third party routers

I've just put into play a TPLink AC1600 after having so many drop outs of the 2.4ghz wifi (without actual drop of the dsl service) on my BT Hub 6 (since the last update on Oct 1st, funnily enough).

I used to notice constant fluctuations in speeds, line attenuation and snr on the BT Hub but on the TP Link, the figures are pretty static. The line attenuation seems to have risen to in the thirties, from 22 since the new router, but the upload speeds have increased and the download speeds decreased slightly. And they are static. Haven't changed for four days now when the BT hub would change every time I went into the hub, varying every hour by the look of things.  Is it that my TP Link can't pick up slight changes or have I been banded becasue of the several attempts last week to get everything going (ie routers turned on and off a few times) and/or the line attenuation going up? If I have been banded, how long a period of stable line with no drop outs do I need to have before it unbands again?

Thanks 

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 2 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers

your connection speed will only change if you drop internet connection  however your attainable speed will fluctuate as will noise margin depending on line conditions  as long as connection speed static then that's ok



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Techwizz
Aspiring Expert
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Message 3 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers

Changes in attenuation between resyncs are ok, as long as they're not too significant (more than 1 dB would suggest that there's a line fault).
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Burmey
Aspiring Expert
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Message 4 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers

Thanks. IM Jolly also seemed to think I might have developed a fault becasue of the change in line attenuation. I'm monitoring that as I'm not noticing too much at the moment. 

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 5 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers

an increase of 10db or thereabouts is  huge and would normally suggest a line resistance  problem - bad connection, bad wiring



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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 6 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers

@Burmey

There is a difference between the two devices. You manually set the profile on the TP Link to VDSL so its only looking at the VDSL frequencies, making it more stable.

The home hub cannot be locked to one profile, and looks at the whole DSL range from 0.1MHz to 12Mhz, so is more likely to be affected by out-of-band noise, so will show wide variations.

Its another reason why the home hub takes longer to connect, and also performs poorly on long ADSL lines where there is a lot of high frequency crosstalk from other circuits.

 

 

 

Burmey
Aspiring Expert
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Message 7 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers


@Keith_Beddoewrote:

@Burmey

 

Its another reason why the home hub takes longer to connect, and also performs poorly on long ADSL lines where there is a lot of high frequency crosstalk from other circuits.

 

Interesting - we're at the very end of the line for our connection - furthest away from the cabinet - presuming that's what you mean? So this could be better for our connection in the long run?

 

I've messed that "quoting" up - trying to respond to Keith... 

 


 

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 8 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers


@Burmey wrote:

@Keith_Beddoewrote:

@Burmey

 

Its another reason why the home hub takes longer to connect, and also performs poorly on long ADSL lines where there is a lot of high frequency crosstalk from other circuits.

 

Interesting - we're at the very end of the line for our connection - furthest away from the cabinet - presuming that's what you mean? So this could be better for our connection in the long run

 


 


The TP Link is likely to be more stable, as its only sampling the expected frequency range for VDSL. If you are on a long line, there will most likely be interfering frequencies which are below the VDSL band.

In your case, there will be crosstalk from ADSL circuits sharing the same local "D" side cable. There will also be stray pickup from things like light dimmers, street lights, and poorly screened power units. These very rarely extend into the VDSL frequency spectrum.

As the home hub has to examine all frequencies, as it auto-negotiates all ADSL and VDSL profiles, its sampling bandwidth has to encompass the whole spectrum, making it more susceptible to interfering frequencies and dropout.

 

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Burmey
Aspiring Expert
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Message 9 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers

Great explanation! Thanks 

The TP Link is doing my head in a bit though. It keeps duplicating entries on the connected devices and allocating the same names for two or three different IP addresses. I guess all the routers have their own particular irritating quirks!

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 10 of 18

Re: Accuracy of stats on third party routers


@Burmey wrote:

Great explanation! Thanks 

The TP Link is doing my head in a bit though. It keeps duplicating entries on the connected devices and allocating the same names for two or three different IP addresses. I guess all the routers have their own particular irritating quirks!


Yes, you will get duplicate names if you have a device that has both wireless and LAN connectivity, as they present two different MAC addresses, although the IP addresses would be different.

Also its the device itself which determines the name, so if you have two identical devices, they will show the same name. Its the same on my TP Link W9970.

The way I dealt with it, is to open a spreadsheet, then copy and paste the contents of the DHCP table, that is a good starting point, bearing in mind that the IP addresses may change if they are not reserved.

IP adresses allocated by DHCP

I reserve all my IP addresses, as its easier that way, as shown here. This will be different on your router.

IP addresses reserved - very important if you want to use bandwidth controls

Then if any devices have the same name, you can amend the name on the spreadsheet to identify the device.

Its also useful to help identify any device which should not be connected to your network.

I keep a number of different worksheets. One is sorted in MAC address order, with the name of the device, followed by the MAC address, and whether its a wireless device, or Ethernet connected.

Another list shows devices that have their IP address reserved.

And one for the allowed wireless devices in the MAC filtering list.

Most of these entries can be copied from one sheet to another.

Once you get started, its quite easy, its just a case of highlighting the entries from the router, copy, then paste.

 

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