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cdrjameson
Newbie
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Message 1 of 4

BT Home Hub 5 replacement?

BT Engineers installed Infinity2 and wired speeds are good (70Mbps+). However wireless is pretty appalling with the HH5. I have just moved in so I have no experience of other routers wireless speed in this home. I have changed the 2.4GHz and 5GHz to unique names and tried connections to both and I have selected the least busy channels in my area, and every combination thereof to no avail. The biggest complaint is from my wife who cannot use Apple Facetime without continual buffering, and broken audio.

 

Most devices are wired directly to the router and through a homeplug network, that has acceptable speeds to stream HD video to the TV. (I know I could get a WiFi hotspot homeplug but I don’t want to lose anymore plugs) The tablets and laptops and smartphones in the home (there are 😎 have very poor speed and also sporadic disconnects, one laptop even has inbuilt ac wireless with similar issues.

 

The HH5 is near to a radiator but no other sources of interference that I am aware of (cordless phones, baby monitors, (the room where you cook food) appliances, fluorescent lights etc.)

 

I am resigned to replacing the HH5 with another more powerful router that also supports ac, preferably one that also supports DD-WRT or Tomato firmware. Currently the master socket connects to the HH5 via a standard telephone cable (this is from memory as I am at work) i.e. there is no separate modem.

 

  1. Do I need to buy an open reach modem to run a different wireless router?
  2. Will other brand modems work?
  3. What technology should I be looking out for in a non BT modem?
  4. What cables connect the modem to the master Socket and to the router?
  5. Is there a significant overhead for connecting an extra appliance? (modem) 

I am aware of an Asus router that has an inbuilt VDSL modem, negating the need for an extra modem but it doesn't support AC Wireless.

 

My current proposal to the wife goes something like this:

 

Master Socket ---- Open Reach Modem ---- ASUS AC68U >>>> iPad

 

  1. Is this going to work?
  2. Unrelated question: When I have been looking into this I have seen several classes of AC wireless routers, AC2300, AC1900, AC1750, AC1600 etc. What does the HH5 claim to be?
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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 2 of 4

Re: BT Home Hub 5 replacement?

You would either need an Openreach modem, or a modem/router which supports a VHDSL connection. Many only support ADSL2.

If you look through the forums, you should be able to find some suggestions. They do tend to be more expensive than ADSL2 modem/routers.

 

The other option would be to simply connect a different wireless access point directly to the Ethernet port of the home hub, and use that for a wireless connections instead. That would be much cheaper.

 

cdrjameson
Newbie
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Message 3 of 4

Re: BT Home Hub 5 replacement?

Thanks for your response. I hadn't considered a WAP; however it would still be in the same room as the HH5, subject to the same interference, if that is the issue. Is the sensitivity of a dedicated WAP that much greater than the HH5?

 

After a quick google AC access points are £100+; the savings are not as important to me as a fast reliable network. I am prepared to spend the money on the best SOHO solution.

 

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 4 of 4

Re: BT Home Hub 5 replacement?

The problem with the HH5, is that it only has internal wireless aerials, which are quite inefficient at transmitting the very tiny amount of power output (1/10th Watt), that all wireless routers are limited to by law.

 

If you buy a wireless access point with two or more external aerials, the ERP (Effective Radiated Power) will be much greater, and the range will be much greater.

 

Range is also determined by the sensitivity of the receive part of the wireless access point. On the HH5, this is swamped by internal electrical noise, due to the proximity of the internal aerials, to the internal circuitry. Having multiple aerials also means greater signal diversity, and better isolation between the transmit and receive sections of the wireless module.

 

You can turn off the wireless on the HH5, and just use the access point.

 

 

 

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