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mike50501
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Message 1 of 12

Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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I am currently half a mile from the exchange on copper wire, using a Netgear DGND3700 router.

My internet is like dial up these days, as I work with larger files.

800Mb last night took 3 hours to upload to youtube

At work it took less than 2 minutes.

I have considered superfast for some time but I want to use my own router.

 

My understanding is the router supplied for the superfast broadband only has two ethernet sockets on it.  This is pretty useless to me as I have a number of devices on my home network I want connected.

A network drive, 2 game consoles, one pc for uploading, and from time to time, other devices that need network access.

The connected devices are rarely on at the same time, but having to keep unplugging devices to connect something else is not ideal. 

Can I use my Netgear router with the superfast broadband?

Is superfast broadband really worth it?  It will still be twisted wire from the street up to my flat throught the 1970s wiring.

Will I still have to use one of those filters on the phone socket as I do at the moment?

If I do end up using the BT router, can I set up mac addressing for connected devices?

Do I have complete control over a BT router setttings?

I haven't used a BT router since the early days of broadband as I have found them highly annoying to set up how I like them set up.

Any advice or tips welcome before I decide to stay as I am or upgrade. 

 

 

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Message 2 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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from what I can read your netgear is only adsl2 and no good for FTTC vdsl2 so won't work

the new BT hub has 4 ethernet conenctions 

connection is self install so your existing connection will be fine just replacing netgear with hub



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Message 3 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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Hi @mike50501. I don’t know where you got the idea that the latest smart hubs only have two Ethernet ports. They have four gigabyte ports which can easily be increased with a simple unmanaged switch. http://bt.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/56400/~/help-for-bt-hubs

To see what is available to you try putting your full address into https://www.btwholesale.com/includes/adsl/main.html

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Message 4 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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@mike50501 wrote:

My understanding is the router supplied for the superfast broadband only has two ethernet sockets on it.  This is pretty useless to me as I have a number of devices on my home network I want connected.

No, it has 4

A network drive, 2 game consoles, one pc for uploading, and from time to time, other devices that need network access.

The connected devices are rarely on at the same time, but having to keep unplugging devices to connect something else is not ideal. 

Can I use my Netgear router with the superfast broadband?

Only if you buy a separate VDSL modem

Is superfast broadband really worth it?  It will still be twisted wire from the street up to my flat throught the 1970s wiring.

No idea, only you can decide that. If you put your number in the DSL checker you will get an estimate of speed you will get. https://www.dslchecker.bt.com/

Will I still have to use one of those filters on the phone socket as I do at the moment?

Yes, unless you fit a filtered faceplate to your master socket.

If I do end up using the BT router, can I set up mac addressing for connected devices?

Not sure what you intend by that.

Do I have complete control over a BT router setttings?

Depends what you mean by that. BT update firmware remotely which you have no control over. User configurable settings are very basic.

I haven't used a BT router since the early days of broadband as I have found them highly annoying to set up how I like them set up.

Any advice or tips welcome before I decide to stay as I am or upgrade. 

 

 


 

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Sage
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Message 5 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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I don't believe mac addressing is available in the hub GUI.

You have complete control over the very limited settings available in the hub GUI.

You can use a compatable VDSL router of which there are many depending on your requirements. Prices start from about £40.

 

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Message 6 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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There is no MAC filtering on any of the BT Home hubs.

MAC filtering normally only applies to wireless connections, but some routers,  like the TP-Link TD-W9970 allow you to filter both wireless and Ethernet connections, and control access time fore each, if required.

 

 

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mike50501
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Message 7 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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I was told on the phone, when I called BT earlier today that the BT hub only had 2 ethernet connections.

I am happy to hear it has four.

MAC  addressing is very important to me for many reasons, with the number of wireless devices that are in my building, as is being able to put my game console in the DMZ .

Static IP addresses also play a part in my home network, so not having that choice would be an issue for me. 

 I can understand why BT don't put too many setting available to the end user, a typical home set up wouldn't be bothered.

Thanks for the replies, I wil look at a suitable third party router and take it from there.

 

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Message 8 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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static ip address should be set in your devices not in the hub



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Message 9 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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@mike50501 wrote:

I was told on the phone, when I called BT earlier today that the BT hub only had 2 ethernet connections.

I am happy to hear it has four.

MAC  addressing is very important to me for many reasons, with the number of wireless devices that are in my building, as is being able to put my game console in the DMZ .

Static IP addresses also play a part in my home network, so not having that choice would be an issue for me. 

 I can understand why BT don't put too many setting available to the end user, a typical home set up wouldn't be bothered.

Thanks for the replies, I wil look at a suitable third party router and take it from there.

 


BT like to keeps things simple, so a factory reset returns it to a known state.

Look at the specs of the TP Link one http://uk.tp-link.com/products/details/cat-15_TD-W9970.html#specifications

There is an emulator as well http://www.tp-link.com/resources/simulator/W9970V2_Emulator/index.htm

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wisty
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Message 10 of 12

Re: Considering Superfast but I want to use my own router

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The BT Smart Hub does let you allocate specific IP addresses to devices on the network either statically or via the DHCP. The DHCP method whereby the SmartHub always allocates the same IP address to a particular MAC is a bit of a hassle to set up initially. You have to get the device on the network first (either by setting the IP address statically, or allowing the SmartHub to allocate one) then change the IP address to the one you want you want and then tell the hub to always use this address. But it does work.

I use a Business Hub, and it does allow for one (but only one) device  to be placed in a DMZ. I can't remember if the domestic smart hub is the same.

If you mean by MAC addressing that you can restrict the wireless devices that can access your network to those you have specifically allowed - then yes you can. 

The SmartHub doesn't have a smuch flexibility as  proper third party routers, but  I suspect it can do what you want.

The biggest constraint is that it doesn't like you using 10.x.x.x as your internal network address space. It uses that for the BT WiFi system. On the Business Hub it does allow that if you disable the BT WiFi hotspot system, not sure about the domestic one.

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