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jedpause
Aspiring Expert
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Message 31 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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You can keep the SH2 there but then you need to change a bunch of settings... I did it years ago and its a pain... so i put my 3rd party one in direct, and set it to PPPoE and so on... perfect 

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jedpause
Aspiring Expert
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Message 32 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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Older devices are getting 450 to 500 e.g with a 8260 Intel wifi card in a laptop

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Kingjed
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 33 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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I just plugged laptop direct into router and got 250!!!  then I set up a direct  connection to the white box, speed spiked at 980 for about 2 seconds then gradually dropped down to 250?  is there something wrong with my connection or is it the "known but unpublished issue" with the speed test sites and the service?

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bp1000
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 34 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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I haven’t tried WiFi via the SH2 but if you install a carefully distributed Wi-fi network in your home, hardwired and carefully placed to distribute devices without channel cross over to reduce interference and multiple transmissions it’s possible to get decent speeds. 

Depending on your device being 2x2, 3x3 or 4x4 

This is 5 runs from an iPhone 11. 

I’ve seen just over 600Mbps on an iPad Pro. 

The APs are WiFi 5 (AC)

 

27B7181B-3CCB-4493-99EE-93F7F838B938.jpeg

BT 900

Wired maxes out as you’d expect 

12FFF2F6-54F7-411C-B4D0-49BD2119D68F.png

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Kingjed
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Message 35 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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Openreach been today apparently my speeds won’t show on test sites as it’s brand new system all the software through the system etc has to be updated or evolve?
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davidsheddan
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 36 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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Hi All,

New to the community, but a working network consultant by day, and have a fair bit of experience with gigabit internet speeds vs reality.

Some background- I've had Gigabit fibre in my flat in Glasgow for 5 years, and I have just upgraded from the BT 300meg- 900meg packages in my main home in the country (Ayrshire).  I went through the steps to improve experience (replacing ISP router), cabling house, deploying separate APs.  This time around I can compare the Hyperoptic experience to BT, and tell you from experience, it's pretty much identically in terms of reality and considerations.

The hard read for a lot of the questions on here- there is no Wifi Service (at least unless you want to talk about hard lined backhauled APs with low power levels, that you'll see 900meg on throughout your house.  With the right APs, hardwired, you might see 500-600meg but fleetingly. However house-wide, if you are buying a 900meg service thinking you'll get that to a wifi device regularly anywhere, you're not really buying for the right reasons.  Don't buy into any network vendor making the same "total wifi" promises on anything FTTP backhauled, it's a different ball game compared to the older FTTC services (70mbit is easy enough to move around with wifi).

You can improve the performance on top of what comes with your services, but you'll need to buy additional hardware, get to understand some fundamentals and maybe have to cut a few holes in your plasterboard!

Some pointers: 

- hard wire any device that you really want to see the speed on, and also the reliability - for me that's Cat5E to TVs, work machine, NAS etc.  In the new house, it will be 6 or 6A (understand the shielding issues).

- if you can't wire (renter etc), wherever possible get the router as close to the main device and cabled.

- if you are going wireless, then the next best option is to not rely in the single inbuilt wifi or mesh type systems that come with a lot of these whole house wifi.  Separate AP (ubiquity is highly recommended) and cable this back to a switch or the BT router.   If you have a big place to cover, a few APs cabled, but on lower power settings (to make devices connect to different APs in different locations) will greatly help, but again you're only going to see 300-400meg.

- If cabling of any description isn't a goer, then Mesh is your next best, but again understand how this technology works, you'll see latency go up, and in my experience (with Orbi and such) they devices get quite stick (they don't quite jump to nearest satellite or such. Really life Orbi 5 speeds- 300meg , doable.  I'd hold off on any Wifi6 gear, as 6E is coming and will give even more spectrum, so don't buy twice.

- We're nearing the end of the options device wise.  IMO don't even bother with power line etc it's junk.

Finally, and i think most importantly have a serious think about why you are buying gigabit internet.  Sure, it's fine to speed test and see big numbers, but in real life it's about what you use it for, and being future proofed.  If you are using it for only wireless devices, for me right now I'd say- save your cash and wait for 6E to come.  If you can run a bit of CAT cabling to devices - great , steam, xbox might work a bit faster.  If you can hard line your mesh APs, or look at some wired APs yes maybe doable.  

I'm not telling anyone that buying the gigabit services that are now more prevalent is wrong, but beyond 100mbit Wifi does become a black art (and that even goes for large enterprise grade vendors with hundreds, thousands or even 10s of thousands of APs).  Perhaps a better way to look at it is- does my steam machine connected by Cat download at 90-100MBps? Yes- great, And my TV plays Netflix in 4k? - Yes- Great,  And my phone and iPad has good signal-great.  Because in reality, that's about the main user case at present.  Happy to share any of my experience or even help folks with a bit of network design improvement.

Cheers

 

David

Rhys792
Beginner
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Message 37 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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Different companies produce/use different wireless adapters but they’re all part of the “IEEE 802.11 standard” with a letter after the 802.11 numbers. The usual rule is the higher the letter, the faster the speed of the network.

This website helps explain the maximum speed each wireless adaptor can achieve:

https://www.netspotapp.com/explaining-wifi-standards.html

 

The iPhone 3GS was released 10 years ago, and uses 802.11b/g Wi-Fi.
That means the maximum speed it can achieve over WiFi will be 54mbps.

Even though the Smart Hub will be pumping out 900mb WiFi speeds, the device itself can't go any faster than 54mbps. 

The iPhone X which was released two years ago uses 802.11n, which means you could typically see 100mbps, but in 'perfect' conditions could reach a max speed of 600mbps. The same restrictions as above apply - this device can't go faster than 600mbps in perfect lab conditions. 

 

That's why we're told to try connect through Ethernet. Modern PCs/Laptops use a "10/100/1000 Ethernet Port" (also known as Gigabit Port) which can achieve a maximum speed of 1gbps.

Some older PCs might use a "10/100 Ethernet port". This means it will allow speeds up to 100mbps.

There are also different types of ethernet cables too – and anything from Cat5e and beyond can achieve up to 1000mpbs.

All very complicated!

davidsheddan
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 38 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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You misunderstand the aim of my post.  The point is most folks don't fully understand wifi vs wired, and the reality of wireless network solutions currently available.

The reality simplified - No wireless standard at present can reliably deliver 900meg to all corners of even a decent sized house reliably.  Even current Wifi6 mesh systems have serious flaws.

Fully aware of both wireless and wired standards, as stated, I'm a network architect by trade for a large blue chip.

"anything from Cat5e and beyond can achieve up to 1000mpbs."

-> I'd be very careful of making this statement, whilst 5e will support 2.5 and perhaps 5Gbit in Multigig, it does seem that this interim standard is not being picked up as one would hope, it's also not guaranteed.  Also when talking about 6A in a home setting, you open the whole shielding can of worms.  Hopefully when we see 6E wifi solutions, with 10gig backhaul, we'll have a cheap/reliable infrastructure for homes which will allow us to fully exploit gigabit WAN connections throughout the home.

 

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Rhys792
Beginner
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Message 39 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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@davidsheddan - I might have accidentally replied to your comment rather than OPs. Post wasn't aimed in retaliation to yours. It's very comprehensive. I wanted to share my experience/knowledge on WiFi. 

Luckman786
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 40 of 172

Re: Full Fibre 900 WiFi speeds

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Looks like will just have to wait till a new router comes out that can handle the ethernet and wifi speeds

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