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barneyhairball
Aspiring Contributor
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Message 1 of 8

Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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I have read that each Modem/Router comes with a pre-defined SSID from the factory.  Does this mean that each Modem/Router has it's OWN UNIQUE SSID?

 

I know I can change it.  But, the web states that each SSID is a 32 bit binary code which I imagine I cannot change.  I suspect I can only change it's name and not its binary code - correct?  I'm trying to remember my school days re: binary.  Does having a binary code mean that only a computer can understand it?  And that by changing it's name from the name given by the manufacturer, eg, Tracy, as named by the Tracy company, mean that I am only changing the name Tracy and NOT its binary code?

 

And, why does changing its name from Tracy to another password of my choice, make the job of hackers any more difficult?

 

Cannot find these answers on the net.  Ta.

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 2 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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changing the wireless network ssid helps you identify your network if in a busy place where there a lot of hubs.  it also helps to split the 2 networks by giving separate SSIDs to identify which is which  http://bt.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/44798/related/1

 

the password is the security so better the password less likely you are to get wireless hacked - use wpa2 security



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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 3 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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I think you are confusing SSID and WPA passkey they are different things.

Distinguished Guru
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Message 4 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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I think you're mixing together several different things.

 

The SSID is the "name" of your router.  If you fire up any wireless gadget and try to connect to the network, it will present you with a list of all the SSIDs that it can see.  BT Home Hubs have names such as "BTHub4_XXXX" where "XXXX" is four random letters.  You can change that name if you want.  It has no effect on security.

 

There's a wireless key.  That's the password you have to give when you attempt to connect to a wireless router or hotspot.  Out of the box, it's a random string of letters and numbers.  You can change that if you like, just make sure you pick something that can't be guessed.

 

There's also a MAC address.  That is factory programmed, and is unique for every Ethernet or WiFi gadget in the World.  Many gadgets won't let you change it.  Even if you can, there's rarely any legitimate reason to do it.  It's unique so that all the devices on a network know who they are talking to.

barneyhairball
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Message 5 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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Why should one want to split the network?

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 6 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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because many devices do not conenct well when the 2.4/5ghz networks sync together



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barneyhairball
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Message 7 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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Thanks for your reply.  Can you elaborate?  What if I change my SSID name by accident to the one next door, or even further afield?  Won't this cause problems?

 

I wonder if the wireless key you mention is what I have found (maybe wrongly) on the net, to be the 32 bit binary code?  What do you think?  I was just given it by BT, and its not 32 digits.  Does this password represent this 32 bit code I wonder?  Yet again, what if the password I decide to use is in use already?  Driving you nuts yet?  Look forward to your advice.  Thanking you.

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 8 of 8

Re: Why change your SSID & what is a binary code?

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the ssid is just simply any name you want to call your network so you know which network to connect to with your wireless devices.  you need a password to stop other people accessing your home network and using your bandwidth.  the password can be anything virtually and as long as you want - choice is yours

 

your network is only visible for a short distance from your home and therefore others futher away by chance using the same ssid is immaterial especially even less likely to use the same wireless password

 

why the problem with ssid/password?



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