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Newbie
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Message 1 of 6

Reactivating a very old broken line

 

We've just restored an old remote house in the mountains, we know it used to have a BT telephone line about 25 years ago, as parts of it are still there but sections of it have clearly been robbed by copper thieves whilst the house was deralict.

 

I would imagine fixing the line will be quite a bit of work. But it's not a new installation, technically, its a broken existing one. Given its only one house, BT might consider it not worth the expense of repairing the line.

 

How does this sort of thing work? I guess I cant just ring up and ask to reconnect, it is unlikely to even come up on searches.

 

Is there a special team who deal with this sort of thing? And who is likely going to have to foot the cable replacement bill?

 

thanks for your help

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 2 of 6

Re: Reactivating a very old broken line

Welcome to this user forum.

 

Its Openreach not BT Retail who look after the external network. This is a BT Retail forum.

 

All you can do is to place an order with the Service Provider of your choice, and see what happens.

 

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Newbie
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Message 3 of 6

Re: Reactivating a very old broken line

 

Oh, I see, sorry for the misunderstanding.

 

BT would be the provider of my choice, I guess I can't ask Openreach directly?

 

So I should just order a connection from BT? Even though I know the old line is missing about 1/2km of its length? I guess it would just come out in the wash. I'd feel bad if an engineer turned up to hook it up, then realised the whole line needed replacing (poles and all) and he's wasted his time.

 

I'll try it anyway I guess!

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Distinguished Sage
Distinguished Sage
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Message 4 of 6

Re: Reactivating a very old broken line

Just place an order, and watch what happens. You cannot speak to Openreach as they are not customer facing.

 

If Openreach have to replace a section of cable to fulfil an order from a provider, they would do a survey to see what the cost is first.

 

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Newbie
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Message 5 of 6

Re: Reactivating a very old broken line

Thanks so much for your help. I will do that and see what happens!

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Recognised Expert
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Message 6 of 6

Re: Reactivating a very old broken line

If the address is still in the system , and you order a service from BT ( any provider should do the same but as you are posting on a BT forum) , chances are they will take the order and give you a totally unrealistic date for service, the Openreach engineer turns up, explains that service won't happen that day and arranges for whatever is required to provide /restore service. If the address isn't still in the system, or is now referred to as something different than it was historically, then the address won't be 'matched' and instead of an appointment for service, they should arrange a survey, and that survey should put in place whatever is required to provide/restore service , they may ask for a deposit of around £300 for the survey, as in the past many would ask , get a bespoke estimate for the work required, ( this could be many hours work for Openreach) only for the potential customer to say thanks but no thanks, charging a (non returnable ) deposit shows you are not a time waster. There is a universal service obligation on Openreach to provide service to anyone who 'reasonably' requests it, this reasonableness , is in effect a limit on what they will spend providing a new service, anything over and above that limit is funded by you, and if you don't agree to that , the order is not taken , or if taken in error, cancelled....it used to be 100 man hours of work, but is now set at around £3000...so say the cost of providing service was £4000 ( new telegraph poles could be around £500 or more each installed) you would be expected to contribute £1000 ( plus whatever your provider charges for a new line, anywhere between £0-£130 )